Finding Truth in Comics

You know, I am not quite sure what to make of this…

Media_httptrustinjesu_davoz

Original cover by Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, Marvel 1962.

Media_httptrustinjesu_upcil

'Fantasy,' painted glass panel, 2010, 16x20 by Brandon Michael Barker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
via Covered: Brandon Michael Barker covers Amazing Fantasy 15.

After checking out Mr. Barker’s site, there appears to be a very Christocentric theme with his stained-glass comic book hero pieces. Like I said, I am not quite sure what to make of it.

Mr. Barker does mention any reason for this Christocentrism and the pieces do not appear particularly offensive or blasphemous. Comic book superheros always bring a Christological allegory into the mix the best representation for this being Superman.

In this reinterpretation of the Amazing Fantasy #15 cover, Mr. Barker includes obvious Christian imagery such as the Α/Ω in the upper right corner, replacing the American Comics Association seal. Of course, there is the halo, which is topped with the acronym for IESVS·NAZARENVS·REX·IVDÆORVM (Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum), which translates to English as “Jesus the Nazarene (Galilean), King of the Jews (Judeans)” (INRI – Wikipedia). Also presented is the Christogram XP (Chi Rho). For an added bonus, Mr. Barker places some Roman Numeral on the lips of Spidey and although I am pretty sure this may not have been his intent, I could not help but think of the Stations of the Cross.

As a fan, Spider-man always seemed like a Christological allegory to me in the sense that one receives graces/powers/talents and must make a decision on how to best utilize these gifts – especially while struggling with one’s own cross or crosses. That famous line from Amazing Fantasy #15, which is mistakenly attributed to Uncle Ben Parker remains relevent and True and as a Catholic, harbors a deep call for evangelism:

“And a lean, silent figure slowly fades into the gathering darkness, aware at last that in this world, with great power there must also come — great responsibility!

— Narrator, Amazing Fantasy #15

Compare that line to the following passage from Luke 12:48 where Jesus states,

“But he who did not know, and did what deserved a beating, shall receive a light beating. Every one to whom much is given, of him will much be required; and of him to whom men commit much they will demand the more.

Talk about finding the Truth of God in the most unlikely of places.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Finding Truth in Comics

  1. Thanks for sharing this with your community… It's an artist's goal for their work to inspire thought and discussion, and I'm so thrilled that these pieces have accomplished that.<br>Regarding your comments and observations, I would first like to note that this is in no way meant to be offensive. I appreciate your open-mindedness and your willingness to think about and explore the

  2. As I said in the post, excellent work. And I feel you. The medium of the comic book always resonates with us because the age-old battle of good vs evil IS. Religion is all about reconciliation with God and both mediums, comics and stained glass, are great at conveying the story with impact. <br><br>Think of the how the advent of stained glass came about. The vast majority of the faithful remained

  3. I had actually considered reversing things a bit, and doing the stations as comic book covers, but I'm having trouble coming up with a title for the “series”… I thought “Jesus! Comics” might be pushing it a bit much towards the sacrilegious, especially considering the brutal content of some of those images. So the same applies to your idea, I believe. It's a matter

  4. I like the Spidey idea. As for the Stations, I do not think there is any tasteful way to parody them. Best net is to take them seriously and possibly place them in the format of a dark graphic novel. It may do more good than what you think. <br><br>JPII once statrd that all legitimate art shows the beauty of God because it is God who made us and in turn we made the art. Use that thought as a

  5. As I said in the post, excellent work. And I feel you. The medium of the comic book always resonates with us because the age-old battle of good vs evil IS. Religion is all about reconciliation with God and both mediums, comics and stained glass, are great at conveying the story with impact. <br><br>Think of the how the advent of stained glass came about. The vast majority of the faithful remained

  6. I had actually considered reversing things a bit, and doing the stations as comic book covers, but I'm having trouble coming up with a title for the “series”… I thought “Jesus! Comics” might be pushing it a bit much towards the sacrilegious, especially considering the brutal content of some of those images. So the same applies to your idea, I believe. It's a matter

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s