Tag Archives: Christian

Memorial of Saint Justin, martyr

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Image via Wikipedia

“As by the Word of God, Jesus our Savior was made Flesh and had both Flesh and Blood for our salvation, so also the food which has been blessed by the word of prayer instituted by Him is both the Flesh and Blood of Jesus Incarnate.”

St. Justin, apologist and martyr, was one of the most important Christian writers of the second century. He himself tells how his study of all the schools of philosophy led him to Christianity, and how he dedicated his life to the defense of the Christian faith as “the one certain and profitable philosophy.”

St. Justin is particularly celebrated for the two Apologies which he was courageous enough to address in succession to the persecuting emperors Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius. One of them contains a description of the rites of baptism and the ceremonies of Mass, thus constituting the most valuable evidence that we possess on the Roman liturgy of his day. He was beheaded in Rome in 165. Justin is also referred to as “the Philosopher.”


READ THE BIBLE AT MASS

First Reading: Acts 17:15, 22—18:1

After Paul’s escorts had taken him to Athens, they came away with instructions for Silas and Timothy to join him as soon as possible.

Then Paul stood up at the Areopagus and said:

“You Athenians, I see that in every respect you are very religious. For as I walked around looking carefully at your shrines, I even discovered an altar inscribed, ‘To an Unknown God.’ What therefore you unknowingly worship, I proclaim to you. The God who made the world and all that is in it, the Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in sanctuaries made by human hands, nor is he served by human hands because he needs anything. Rather it is he who gives to everyone life and breath and everything. He made from one the whole human race to dwell on the entire surface of the earth, and he fixed the ordered seasons and the boundaries of their regions, so that people might seek God, even perhaps grope for him and find him, though indeed he is not far from any one of us. For ‘In him we live and move and have our being,’ as even some of your poets have said, ‘For we too are his offspring.’ Since therefore we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the divinity is like an image fashioned from gold, silver, or stone by human art and imagination. God has overlooked the times of ignorance, but now he demands that all people everywhere repent because he has established a day on which he will ‘judge the world with justice’ through a man he has appointed, and he has provided confirmation for all by raising him from the dead.”

When they heard about resurrection of the dead, some began to scoff, but others said, “We should like to hear you on this some other time.” And so Paul left them. But some did join him, and became believers. Among them were Dionysius, a member of the Court of the Areopagus, a woman named Damaris, and others with them.

After this he left Athens and went to Corinth.

Responsorial Psalm148:1-2, 11-12, 13, 14

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the LORD from the heavens;
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you his angels;
praise him, all you his hosts.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Let the kings of the earth and all peoples,
the princes and all the judges of the earth,
Young men too, and maidens,
old men and boys.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the name of the LORD,
for his name alone is exalted;
His majesty is above earth and heaven.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has lifted up the horn of his people;
Be this his praise from all his faithful ones,
from the children of Israel, the people close to him.
Alleluia.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel: Jn 16:12-15

Jesus said to his disciples:

“I have much more to tell you, but you cannot bear it now. But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth. He will not speak on his own, but he will speak what he hears, and will declare to you the things that are coming. He will glorify me, because he will take from what is mine and declare it to you. Everything that the Father has is mine; for this reason I told you that he will take from what is mine and declare it to you.”


SAINT JUSTIN
Justin, the son of Priscus, was a Greek by race, and was born at Nablus in Palestine. He passed his youth in the study of letters. When he grew to manhood he was so taken with the love of philosophy and the desire of truth, that he became a student of philosphy and examined the teaching of all the philosophers. He found in them only deceitful wisdom and error. He received the light of heaven from a venerable old man, who was a stranger to him, and embraced the philosophy of the true Christian faith. Henceforth he had the books of Holy Scripture in his hands by day and night, and his soul was filled with the divine fire enkindled by his meditations. Having thus acquired the excellent knowledge of Jesus Christ, he devoted his learning to the composition of many books explaining and propagating the Christian faith.

Among the most famous of the works of Justin are his two Apologies or Defenses of the Christian faith. These he offered in the Senate to the Emperor Antoninus Pius and his sons, together with Marcus Antoninus Verus and Lucius Aurelius Commodus, who were cruelly persecuting the followers of Christ. By these Apologies and his vigorous disputations in defense of the faith he obtained a public edict from the government to stay the slaughter of the Christians. But Justin himself did not escape. He had blamed the wicked life led by Crescens the Cynic, who caused him to be accused and arrested. He was brought before Rusticus, the Prefect of Rome, and questioned concerning the doctrine of the Christians. Whereupon he made this good confession in the presence of many witnesses: “The right doctrine which we Christian men do keep with godliness is this: that we believe that there is one God, the maker and creator of all things, both those which are seen and those which bodily eyes do not see; and that we confess the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who was of old foretold by the Prophets, and who is to come to judge all mankind.”

In his first Apology Justin had given, in order to rebut the slanders of the heathen, an open account of the Christian assemblies and of the holy Mysteries there celebrated. The prefect asked him in what place he and Christ’s other faithful servants in the city were accustomed to meet. But Justin, fearing to betray the holy mysteries and his brethren, mentioned only his own dwelling near the famous church in the house of Pudens, where he lived and taught his disciples. The prefect then bade him choose whether he would sacrifice to the gods or suffer a cruel scourging. The unconquered champion of the faith answered that he had always desired to suffer for the Lord Jesus Christ, from whom he hoped to receive a great reward in heaven. The prefect thereupon sentenced him to death, and thus this excellent philosopher, giving praise to God, suffered the pain of scourging, and then shed his blood for Christ, and was crowned with martyrdom. Some of the faithful stole away his body and buried it in a fitting place.

Excerpted from The Liturgical Year, Abbot Gueranger O.S.B.

Patron: Apologists; lecturers; orators; philosophers; speakers.

Symbols: Ox; pen; sword; red-hot helmet.

Things to Do:

  • St. Justin was a prolific writer, and one of the first Christians to write about the Eucharistic liturgy of the early church. Read some of Justin Martyr’s writings.
  • Read this account of St. Justin’s life and another account from the Church Fathers of his martyrdom.
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia has an excellent entry on St. Justin. Their summary: “The role of St. Justin may be summed up in one word: it is that of a witness. We behold in him one of the highest and purest pagan souls of his time in contact with Christianity, compelled to accept its irrefragable truth, its pure moral teaching, and to admire its superhuman constancy. He is also a witness of the second-century Church which he describes for us in its faith, its life, its worship, at a time when Christianity yet lacked the firm organization that it was soon to develop, but the larger outlines of whose constitution and doctrine are already luminously drawn by Justin. Finally, Justin was a witness for Christ unto death.”

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year

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Memorial of Saint Justin, martyr

Justin MartyrImage via Wikipedia

“As by the Word of God, Jesus our Savior was made Flesh and had both Flesh and Blood for our salvation, so also the food which has been blessed by the word of prayer instituted by Him is both the Flesh and Blood of Jesus Incarnate.”

St. Justin, apologist and martyr, was one of the most important Christian writers of the second century. He himself tells how his study of all the schools of philosophy led him to Christianity, and how he dedicated his life to the defense of the Christian faith as “the one certain and profitable philosophy.”

St. Justin is particularly celebrated for the two Apologies which he was courageous enough to address in succession to the persecuting emperors Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius. One of them contains a description of the rites of baptism and the ceremonies of Mass, thus constituting the most valuable evidence that we possess on the Roman liturgy of his day. He was beheaded in Rome in 165. Justin is also referred to as “the Philosopher.”


READ THE BIBLE AT MASS

First Reading: Acts 17:15, 22—18:1

After Paul’s escorts had taken him to Athens, they came away with instructions for Silas and Timothy to join him as soon as possible.

Then Paul stood up at the Areopagus and said:

“You Athenians, I see that in every respect you are very religious. For as I walked around looking carefully at your shrines, I even discovered an altar inscribed, ‘To an Unknown God.’ What therefore you unknowingly worship, I proclaim to you. The God who made the world and all that is in it, the Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in sanctuaries made by human hands, nor is he served by human hands because he needs anything. Rather it is he who gives to everyone life and breath and everything. He made from one the whole human race to dwell on the entire surface of the earth, and he fixed the ordered seasons and the boundaries of their regions, so that people might seek God, even perhaps grope for him and find him, though indeed he is not far from any one of us. For ‘In him we live and move and have our being,’ as even some of your poets have said, ‘For we too are his offspring.’ Since therefore we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the divinity is like an image fashioned from gold, silver, or stone by human art and imagination. God has overlooked the times of ignorance, but now he demands that all people everywhere repent because he has established a day on which he will ‘judge the world with justice’ through a man he has appointed, and he has provided confirmation for all by raising him from the dead.”

When they heard about resurrection of the dead, some began to scoff, but others said, “We should like to hear you on this some other time.” And so Paul left them. But some did join him, and became believers. Among them were Dionysius, a member of the Court of the Areopagus, a woman named Damaris, and others with them.

After this he left Athens and went to Corinth.

Responsorial Psalm148:1-2, 11-12, 13, 14

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the LORD from the heavens;
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you his angels;
praise him, all you his hosts.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Let the kings of the earth and all peoples,
the princes and all the judges of the earth,
Young men too, and maidens,
old men and boys.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the name of the LORD,
for his name alone is exalted;
His majesty is above earth and heaven.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has lifted up the horn of his people;
Be this his praise from all his faithful ones,
from the children of Israel, the people close to him.
Alleluia.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel: Jn 16:12-15

Jesus said to his disciples:

“I have much more to tell you, but you cannot bear it now. But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth. He will not speak on his own, but he will speak what he hears, and will declare to you the things that are coming. He will glorify me, because he will take from what is mine and declare it to you. Everything that the Father has is mine; for this reason I told you that he will take from what is mine and declare it to you.”


SAINT JUSTIN
Justin, the son of Priscus, was a Greek by race, and was born at Nablus in Palestine. He passed his youth in the study of letters. When he grew to manhood he was so taken with the love of philosophy and the desire of truth, that he became a student of philosphy and examined the teaching of all the philosophers. He found in them only deceitful wisdom and error. He received the light of heaven from a venerable old man, who was a stranger to him, and embraced the philosophy of the true Christian faith. Henceforth he had the books of Holy Scripture in his hands by day and night, and his soul was filled with the divine fire enkindled by his meditations. Having thus acquired the excellent knowledge of Jesus Christ, he devoted his learning to the composition of many books explaining and propagating the Christian faith.

Among the most famous of the works of Justin are his two Apologies or Defenses of the Christian faith. These he offered in the Senate to the Emperor Antoninus Pius and his sons, together with Marcus Antoninus Verus and Lucius Aurelius Commodus, who were cruelly persecuting the followers of Christ. By these Apologies and his vigorous disputations in defense of the faith he obtained a public edict from the government to stay the slaughter of the Christians. But Justin himself did not escape. He had blamed the wicked life led by Crescens the Cynic, who caused him to be accused and arrested. He was brought before Rusticus, the Prefect of Rome, and questioned concerning the doctrine of the Christians. Whereupon he made this good confession in the presence of many witnesses: “The right doctrine which we Christian men do keep with godliness is this: that we believe that there is one God, the maker and creator of all things, both those which are seen and those which bodily eyes do not see; and that we confess the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who was of old foretold by the Prophets, and who is to come to judge all mankind.”

In his first Apology Justin had given, in order to rebut the slanders of the heathen, an open account of the Christian assemblies and of the holy Mysteries there celebrated. The prefect asked him in what place he and Christ’s other faithful servants in the city were accustomed to meet. But Justin, fearing to betray the holy mysteries and his brethren, mentioned only his own dwelling near the famous church in the house of Pudens, where he lived and taught his disciples. The prefect then bade him choose whether he would sacrifice to the gods or suffer a cruel scourging. The unconquered champion of the faith answered that he had always desired to suffer for the Lord Jesus Christ, from whom he hoped to receive a great reward in heaven. The prefect thereupon sentenced him to death, and thus this excellent philosopher, giving praise to God, suffered the pain of scourging, and then shed his blood for Christ, and was crowned with martyrdom. Some of the faithful stole away his body and buried it in a fitting place.

Excerpted from The Liturgical Year, Abbot Gueranger O.S.B.

Patron: Apologists; lecturers; orators; philosophers; speakers.

Symbols: Ox; pen; sword; red-hot helmet.

Things to Do:

  • St. Justin was a prolific writer, and one of the first Christians to write about the Eucharistic liturgy of the early church. Read some of Justin Martyr’s writings.
  • Read this account of St. Justin’s life and another account from the Church Fathers of his martyrdom.
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia has an excellent entry on St. Justin. Their summary: “The role of St. Justin may be summed up in one word: it is that of a witness. We behold in him one of the highest and purest pagan souls of his time in contact with Christianity, compelled to accept its irrefragable truth, its pure moral teaching, and to admire its superhuman constancy. He is also a witness of the second-century Church which he describes for us in its faith, its life, its worship, at a time when Christianity yet lacked the firm organization that it was soon to develop, but the larger outlines of whose constitution and doctrine are already luminously drawn by Justin. Finally, Justin was a witness for Christ unto death.”

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year

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Immerse Yourself in the Truth and Life of Our Blessed Lord

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This long overdue review of the Truth and Life Audio Bible is one of the most difficult reviews I have yet to complete simply because I find it difficult to articulate the experience of immersing oneself in Scripture in this fashion.

The immersive feeling is a testament (no pun intended) to the level of production put forth into this resource. Not only does the all-star cast perform to the level one would expect but the subtleties of the score and sound effects is what completes the picture for the mind’s eye.

When we read we often paint a picture in our minds of the places, persons and events described within the pages. Obviously, this is no different with the Bible. Yet we carry some prejudices into pages of Scripture when we read whether images on holy cards or visual performances but also theological precepts and solid Catholic teaching.

The Truth and Life Dramatized Audio Bible allows one to dig deeper granting an experience of oral teaching that is usually experienced at Mass with the aid of an able lector. Listening to the narration and dialogue drew me in and my Catholic formation began to pick out the Truth behind the Church’s teachings.

Yet, listening to an audio Bible, even of this caliber, does not replace the reading of Sacred Scripture. Letting the splendor of the acting and familiar voices walk you through the events of the New Testament in a manner that can only add to the mystery that is the written Word of God: multi-layered, multi-faceted, multi-generational.

Again, this review is difficult to articulate because the Word, the sounds, the score and the actors all meld together under superb direction and editing to give all faithful Christians – not just Catholics – audio food for the soul. This is a recording that needs to be experienced rather than read about.

Make sure you add this audio bible to your collection today. It makes a great Confirmation and/or Ordination gift.

I wrote this review of Truth & Life Dramatized Audio Bible – New Testament for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, your source for Baptism Gifts and First Communion Gifts. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases. I receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.

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Immerse Yourself in the Truth and Life of Our Blessed Lord


This long overdue review of the Truth and Life Audio Bible is one of the most difficult reviews I have yet to complete simply because I find it difficult to articulate the experience of immersing oneself in Scripture in this fashion.

The immersive feeling is a testament (no pun intended) to the level of production put forth into this resource. Not only does the all-star cast perform to the level one would expect but the subtleties of the score and sound effects is what completes the picture for the mind’s eye.

When we read we often paint a picture in our minds of the places, persons and events described within the pages. Obviously, this is no different with the Bible. Yet we carry some prejudices into pages of Scripture when we read whether images on holy cards or visual performances but also theological precepts and solid Catholic teaching.

The Truth and Life Dramatized Audio Bible allows one to dig deeper granting an experience of oral teaching that is usually experienced at Mass with the aid of an able lector. Listening to the narration and dialogue drew me in and my Catholic formation began to pick out the Truth behind the Church’s teachings.

Yet, listening to an audio Bible, even of this caliber, does not replace the reading of Sacred Scripture. Letting the splendor of the acting and familiar voices walk you through the events of the New Testament in a manner that can only add to the mystery that is the written Word of God: multi-layered, multi-faceted, multi-generational.

Again, this review is difficult to articulate because the Word, the sounds, the score and the actors all meld together under superb direction and editing to give all faithful Christians – not just Catholics – audio food for the soul. This is a recording that needs to be experienced rather than read about.

Make sure you add this audio bible to your collection today. It makes a great Confirmation and/or Ordination gift.

I wrote this review of Truth & Life Dramatized Audio Bible – New Testament for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, your source for Baptism Gifts and First Communion Gifts. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases. I receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.

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This is My Body: Jesus Institutes the Eucharist

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Jesus with the Eucharist (detail),
mid-late 16th century.
Image via  Wikipedia.

Then he took the bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which will be given for you; do this in memory of me.” And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which will be shed for you.”

— Our Blessed Lord, Luke 22:19-20 (NAB)

Sent via iMissal App iTunes AppStore: http://bit.ly/eYW5KC Android Marketplace: http://bit.ly/gtxzWb

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This is My Body: Jesus Institutes the Eucharist

Jesus with the Eucharist (detail),
mid-late 16th century.
Image via  Wikipedia.

Then he took the bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which will be given for you; do this in memory of me.” And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which will be shed for you.”

— Our Blessed Lord, Luke 22:19-20 (NAB)

Sent via iMissal App iTunes AppStore: http://bit.ly/eYW5KC Android Marketplace: http://bit.ly/gtxzWb

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A Call for the Return of [Proper] Christian Patriarchy

For a while now, I have been working my way through a thin volume from Tan Books/Saint Benedict Press 2010 releases: The Three Marks of Manhood: How to Be Priest, Prophet and King of Your Family. The length of time it took me to read this book in no way reflects the content or the author’s skill. What it does say is that I need to find more to time to pray and sleep.

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The Three Marks of Manhood: How to be Priest, Prophet, and King of Your Family. Cover image via AquinasAndMore.com

From the publisher:

Author G.C. Dilsaver writes that the time has come for Catholic families to re-discover true patriarchy – time for Catholic men to accept and fulfill their role as leader and head of their families. Christian manhood, as ordained by God and confirmed by Catholic teaching, is symbolized by three staffs: the Scepter of authority and self-discipline, the Crosier of spiritual stewardship, and the Cross of redemptive suffering. Three Marks of Manhood can help Christian families realize their identity to the fullest – empowering them to resist the encroachment of secular culture. Read it and learn how to build a strong and lasting marriage, raise children to become faithful men and women of God, and foster an authentic Catholic culture in your home.

On the surface, the above description seems to portray a self-help book for men. This is less a self-help book and more a splash of cold water to the face. Dilsaver does not pull a single punch it outlining the woeful state of manhood today, especially in the case of Christian men and even more especially those of the One True Faith – Catholics.

The book proceeds to build a comparison between the Mystical Body of Christ and what has long been called as the “little” Church otherwise referred to more recently as the “domestic” Church, that is the household of a validly married couple. In this, Dilsaver reminds men (and their spouses) that although the ordinary vocation of the espoused is to be a husband, we act in similar fashion of the ministerial priesthood by “putting on Christ” by means of the relationships in our lives. These relationships include our dealings with God, our wives, our children, our employers, etc.

Every point and lesson touched on in this book is certainly orthodox and on point. Perhaps it is fact that initially put me off as I flipped through the first few pages. Despite my fervent return to the Faith and my profession of fidelity to the Church and Christ, I felt a bit disturbed at the tone, which can most certainly be construed as counter-cultural especially by hardened feminists.

Long story short, this book does not mince words concerning the present state of manhood and offers valid, faithful and long-standing suggestions on how to reclaim our God-given roles as priest, prophet and king of our homes reminding us of St. Paul’s words in his Letter to the Ephesians:

Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ. Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior. As the church is subject to Christ, so let wives also be subject in everything to their husbands. Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. Even so husbands should love their wives as their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. For no man ever hates his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, as Christ does the church, because we are members of his body. “For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.” This is a great mystery, and I mean in reference to Christ and the church; however, let each one of you love his wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband.

— Ephesians (RSV) 5:21-33

You can purchase this book here.


I wrote this review of The Three Marks of Manhood for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, your source for Baptism Gifts and First Communion Gifts. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases.

I receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.


A Call for the Return of [Proper] Christian Patriarchy

For a while now, I have been working my way through a thin volume from Tan Books/Saint Benedict Press 2010 releases: The Three Marks of Manhood: How to Be Priest, Prophet and King of Your Family. The length of time it took me to read this book in no way reflects the content or the author’s skill. What it does say is that I need to find more to time to pray and sleep.


The Three Marks of Manhood: How to be Priest, Prophet, and King of Your Family. Cover image via AquinasAndMore.com

From the publisher:

Author G.C. Dilsaver writes that the time has come for Catholic families to re-discover true patriarchy – time for Catholic men to accept and fulfill their role as leader and head of their families. Christian manhood, as ordained by God and confirmed by Catholic teaching, is symbolized by three staffs: the Scepter of authority and self-discipline, the Crosier of spiritual stewardship, and the Cross of redemptive suffering. Three Marks of Manhood can help Christian families realize their identity to the fullest – empowering them to resist the encroachment of secular culture. Read it and learn how to build a strong and lasting marriage, raise children to become faithful men and women of God, and foster an authentic Catholic culture in your home.

On the surface, the above description seems to portray a self-help book for men. This is less a self-help book and more a splash of cold water to the face. Dilsaver does not pull a single punch it outlining the woeful state of manhood today, especially in the case of Christian men and even more especially those of the One True Faith – Catholics.

The book proceeds to build a comparison between the Mystical Body of Christ and what has long been called as the “little” Church otherwise referred to more recently as the “domestic” Church, that is the household of a validly married couple. In this, Dilsaver reminds men (and their spouses) that although the ordinary vocation of the espoused is to be a husband, we act in similar fashion of the ministerial priesthood by “putting on Christ“ by means of the relationships in our lives. These relationships include our dealings with God, our wives, our children, our employers, etc.

Every point and lesson touched on in this book is certainly orthodox and on point. Perhaps it is fact that initially put me off as I flipped through the first few pages. Despite my fervent return to the Faith and my profession of fidelity to the Church and Christ, I felt a bit disturbed at the tone, which can most certainly be construed as counter-cultural especially by hardened feminists.

Long story short, this book does not mince words concerning the present state of manhood and offers valid, faithful and long-standing suggestions on how to reclaim our God-given roles as priest, prophet and king of our homes reminding us of St. Paul’s words in his Letter to the Ephesians:

Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ. Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior. As the church is subject to Christ, so let wives also be subject in everything to their husbands. Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. Even so husbands should love their wives as their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. For no man ever hates his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, as Christ does the church, because we are members of his body. “For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.” This is a great mystery, and I mean in reference to Christ and the church; however, let each one of you love his wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband.

— Ephesians (RSV) 5:21-33

You can purchase this book here.


I wrote this review of The Three Marks of Manhood for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, your source for Baptism Gifts and First Communion Gifts. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases.

I receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.


Ending Abortion by 2020

Take the pledge and make a statement against the willful murder of the most innocent, defenseless of children.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

Ending Abortion by 2020

Take the pledge and make a statement against the willful murder of the most innocent, defenseless of children.

Vodpod videos no longer available.