Tag Archives: Divine Mercy

3:10 to Yuma – 3:00 to Divine Mercy

Cover of "3:10 to Yuma (Widescreen Editio...
Cover of 3:10 to Yuma (Widescreen Edition)

Okay, the title of the post may not completely make sense but whatever – it’s my blog and I like it.

Anyway, I just finished watching the remake of 3:10 to Yuma starring Russell Crowe and Christian Bale and found it phenomenal and spiritually rich. At the moment I cannot recall the ratings for the film upon its release but because it is a Western and I am partial to that genre.

There is so much to the Western. For me the American cowboy is for the US what the knight is for the UK. And with that idealization comes much in the way of what makes those stories and characters great and timeless – that is chivalry and self-sacrifice. 3:10 was certainly no different in my eyes.

With Crowe as the antagonist Ben Wade, we find an extremely charismatic villain whose love of creating art betrays his reputation like an atoll betrays the expanse of the open ocean. On the flip side, Bale’s protagonist Dan Evans, is one whose own dignity is seemingly borders on stubborn pride as he remains set on seeing out his choices to the end despite what appeared to me as doubt in said choices and even himself.

However, as the film crescendos towards the final scene there are breaks of what I would call examples of God’s Divine Mercy and the alleviation of Evans’ internal sufferings which stem from internal doubt. The doubt and possibly guilt that many a good father carries with them when they feel that they cannot and have not provided for their families. Add that to an injury gained on the battle field but not by the “courageous” fight against the enemy but from a fellow soldier via what we now call “friendly fire.” How many veterans return home from the front with an injury and barely a prospect to support themselves or their families?

The first of these glimpse of Mercy begins with the fact that Even decides to make a seemingly foolish decision to risk his life and that of his family to bring in Wade for $200 – just enough to skin by. This exhibits a man who is not greedy but desperate, involving himself where he has no obligation.

Despite this Evans survives where other die and his life is spared by the murderous outlaw Wade on more than one occasion – again, displaying the fact that Wade certainly has a moral compass – a conscience though malformed and crooked. Together both good and bad (not so bad) begin to see and understand each other in a way that, as evidenced in the scene at the train station, one could speculate that the two may have been friends were their paths slightly different. On the one hand Wade begins to respect Evans as a man of integrity and honor as the father proves that he did not ultimately choose to escort Wade to the train as a payout but rather as a way to show his oldest son that his father is a man integrity and of self-sacrifice. Wade now understands why he would turn down the $1000 he offered Evans while getting Mr. Butterfield, the railroad man, to promise that very amount simply because he “was the only to take Wade to the train when others wouldn’t.”

On top of that, the entire exchange concerning payoffs took place rain came down upon the drought-ridden town of Brisby, which eliminated, in the eyes of Wade, the monetary purpose for Evans choice. To me it seemed that the rain washed away the weight of doubt off the back of Evans and reinforced what faith he had in God. And no knowing that the his family was more than taken cared of – he was free to make good on his word for the simple reason that it was his word and that he was doing what he could to obtain justice for many who fell at the barrel of Wades revolver. A revolver that interestingly enough, played what was perhaps the most important part of the ending scene — giving us a glimpses of how Christ crucified joined with the selfless act of Evans brought hope and a shimmer of redemption to a violent villain.

Of course a film made today must show that the bad guy remains bad (thus Wade calls on his trusty steed) but I could certainly see that the director intended the Crucifix on the handle of Wade’s gun to be the equating factor for Wade “somewhat” redeeming himself. And through those last moments the audience knew that Evans would not have made the journey without the aid of Wade. It almost reminded me of Simon of Cyrene  helping Jesus with His cross. The man wanted nothing to do with it but seeing that this was not only his redemption but the redemption of the entire human race – how could he not have joined willingly after a little prodding initially?

I know much of what I say can be considered a stretch but for me I see examples of God’s Mercy and Love in our dramatic tales in print and on stage and screen. It is written in our hearts.

Looking to Devote Yourself the Message of Divine Mercy? There is an App For That

From the ZENIT:

A free iPhone application, which was just released for Android phones as well, aims to spread hope worldwide by promoting the message and devotion of Divine Mercy.

That right Android and iOS lovers and Divine Mercy devotees, we have a specific app to aid us in our devotion to the Divine Mercy of Our Lord and the mission to spread this most magnificent message. And all in time for Divine Mercy Sunday!
I am downloading this app for my HTC Hero (CDMA) running Android 2.3 (Cyanogenmod 7) and look forward to using this to aid in my devotion. Beware thought, the Android version is a girth 8.34Mb so you may need to make some room for it. But when you consider that this is an app to aid you in your walk with the Lord…who needs another version of Angry Birds?

Get this app (available for Android devices or iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch), and discover why the message of Divine Mercy is the largest grassroots movement in the history of the Catholic Church.
Divine Mercy — Love it. Live it. Tell a friend.

via The Divine Mercy Message from the Marians of the Immaculate Conception 

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Looking to Devote Yourself the Message of Divine Mercy? There is an App For That

From the ZENIT:

A free iPhone application, which was just released for Android phones as well, aims to spread hope worldwide by promoting the message and devotion of Divine Mercy.

That right Android and iOS lovers and Divine Mercy devotees, we have a specific app to aid us in our devotion to the Divine Mercy of Our Lord and the mission to spread this most magnificent message. And all in time for Divine Mercy Sunday!
I am downloading this app for my HTC Hero (CDMA) running Android 2.3 (Cyanogenmod 7) and look forward to using this to aid in my devotion. Beware thought, the Android version is a girth 8.34Mb so you may need to make some room for it. But when you consider that this is an app to aid you in your walk with the Lord…who needs another version of Angry Birds?

Get this app (available for Android devices or iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch), and discover why the message of Divine Mercy is the largest grassroots movement in the history of the Catholic Church.
Divine Mercy — Love it. Live it. Tell a friend.

via The Divine Mercy Message from the Marians of the Immaculate Conception 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Memorial of St. Faustina, Virgin (Optional)

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Saint Faustina with Divine Mercy Image

Saint Faustina holds a special place in my life because it was to her that the Divine Mercy devotion was privately revealed. It was on Divine Mercy Sunday in New Orleans two years ago when I decided that I could no longer make excuses for remaining outside of the Church. Jesus was calling me back Home and reassuring me of His Mercy and Love for me.
Read the Bible at Mass

  • First Reading: Galatians 1:13-24
  • Responsorial: Psalm 139:1-3, 13-15
  • Gospel: Luke 10:38-42
  • Reflections from the Saints

    “O Christ, let my greatest delight be to see You loved and Your praise and glory proclaimed, especially the honor of Your mercy. O Christ, let me glorify Your goodness and mercy to the last moment of my life, with every drop of my blood and every beat of my heart. Would that I be transformed into a hymn of adoration of You. When I find myself on my deathbed, may the last beat of my heart be a loving hymn glorifying Your unfathomable mercy.”

    – St. Faustina


    St. Faustina Kowalska, Virgin
    Saint Faustina was born in the 20th century, and canonized in the year 2000. Jesus chose her to deliver to the modern world a message as old as eternity. It is the message of his love for all people, especially sinners. Jesus said to Faustina, “Today I am sending you with my mercy to the people of the whole world.” It is his desire to heal the aching world, to draw all people into his merciful heart of love.

    On February 22, 1931, Jesus appeared to Faustina as the King of Divine Mercy. He asked her to have a picture painted of him as she saw him — clothed in white, with red and white rays of light streaming from his heart. The rays represent the blood and water that flowed from the side of Jesus on the cross. Under the image are the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.”

    Many people did not believe Faustina at first. The sisters in her own convent thought that Jesus could not possibly have selected her for this great favor. After all, she was an uneducated peasant girl. Her superiors often refused to give her permission to carry out Jesus’ requests. Church theologians, too, doubted her word. Jesus told Faustina that he loved her obedience and that his will would be done in the end.

    Media_httpwwwcatholic_xavcd

    In June 1934 an artist completed the painting of the Divine Mercy according to her instructions; and it soon became a focus for devotion. Faustina continued to record in her diary the appearances of Jesus. The diary was translated into English and published in 1987 with the title Divine Mercy in My Soul.

    Faustina, baptized Helena, had grown up in a poor Polish family of 10 children. When she was 15 years old, she quit school in order to work as a housemaid to help support her family. By the time she was 18, she was sure that God was calling her to a religious life, but her parents objected. So she tried to put it out of her mind. But one night, while the lively polka music was playing at a village dance, Helena saw Jesus, sad and suffering. The very next day she packed a small bag and went to the capital city of Warsaw to join the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy. There she received the name Sister Mary Faustina.

    About 10 years later, Faustina contracted tuberculosis. Soon she was too weak to manage the heavy gardening assigned to her. So she was given the job of gatekeeper. She was able to show mercy to the poor people who came to the convent looking for food. Once Jesus came to the door as a poor young man. After he had eaten the soup and bread Faustina gave him, she recognized him. Jesus told her he had come to experience with great joy her tender love and mercy.

    Faustina was canonized by the first Polish pope, John Paul II, on April 30, 2000. The first Sunday after Easter was declared Divine Mercy Sunday.

    Excerpted from Saints and Feast Days: A Resource and Activity Book by The Sisters of Notre Dame of Chardon, Ohio.

    Symbols: young nun in habit; nun with vision of Jesus, with two streams of light, one red and white (Divine Mercy image).

    Things to Do:

    • Read a short biography of Sr. Mary Faustina Kowalska from the Vatican.
    • Read the Holy Father’s April 30, 2000 Homily at the solemn Mass celebrated for the canonization of Sr. Mary Faustina Kowalska.
    • From the Directory on Popular Piety and Liturgy: Devotion to the Divine Mercy

      In connection with the octave of Easter, recent years have witnessed the development and diffusion of a special devotion to the Divine Mercy based on the writings of Sr. Faustina Kowalska who was canonized 30 April 2000. It concentrates on the mercy poured forth in Christ’s death and resurrection, fount of the Holy Spirit who forgives sins and restores joy at having been redeemed. Since the liturgy of the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday — as it is now called — is the natural locus in which to express man’s acceptance of the Redeemer’s mercy, the faithful should be taught to understand this devotion in the light of the liturgical celebrations of these Easter days. Indeed, “the paschal Christ is the definitive incarnation of mercy, his living sign which is both historico-salvific and eschatological. At the same time, the Easter liturgy places the words of the psalm on our lips: “I shall sing forever of the Lord’s mercy” (Ps 89[88]: 2).

    • Read more from our Catholic Culture library about the Divine Mercy devotion, in particular, a short description of The Divine Mercy devotion
    • St. Faustina came from Poland. John Paul II was also Polish, and had a great devotion to the Divine Mercy. He made it a feast day on the second Sunday after Easter. Find out more about Poland and its customs. It’s a very Catholic country, with deep devotion to Our Lady. A wonderful book that gives a wonderful understanding of the culture is the Pope’s biography A Witness to Hope by George Wiegel. This site contains many Polish Traditions. The Polish Art Center has many resources for Polish customs.
    • Try your hand at a Polish dish or two. Perhaps practice making some of the favorite foods for the Polish Wigilia (Christmas Eve Dinner) Pierogi (or Pirohi) is one of the most popular Polish foods, but do some research to find other recipes.

    Memorial of St. Faustina, Virgin (Optional)

    divine mercy jesus & faustina
    Saint Faustina with Divine Mercy Image

    Saint Faustina holds a special place in my life because it was to her that the Divine Mercy devotion was privately revealed. It was on Divine Mercy Sunday in New Orleans two years ago when I decided that I could no longer make excuses for remaining outside of the Church. Jesus was calling me back Home and reassuring me of His Mercy and Love for me.
    Read the Bible at Mass

    Reflections from the Saints

    “O Christ, let my greatest delight be to see You loved and Your praise and glory proclaimed, especially the honor of Your mercy. O Christ, let me glorify Your goodness and mercy to the last moment of my life, with every drop of my blood and every beat of my heart. Would that I be transformed into a hymn of adoration of You. When I find myself on my deathbed, may the last beat of my heart be a loving hymn glorifying Your unfathomable mercy.”
    – St. Faustina

    St. Faustina Kowalska, Virgin
    Saint Faustina was born in the 20th century, and canonized in the year 2000. Jesus chose her to deliver to the modern world a message as old as eternity. It is the message of his love for all people, especially sinners. Jesus said to Faustina, “Today I am sending you with my mercy to the people of the whole world.” It is his desire to heal the aching world, to draw all people into his merciful heart of love.

    On February 22, 1931, Jesus appeared to Faustina as the King of Divine Mercy. He asked her to have a picture painted of him as she saw him — clothed in white, with red and white rays of light streaming from his heart. The rays represent the blood and water that flowed from the side of Jesus on the cross. Under the image are the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.”

    Many people did not believe Faustina at first. The sisters in her own convent thought that Jesus could not possibly have selected her for this great favor. After all, she was an uneducated peasant girl. Her superiors often refused to give her permission to carry out Jesus’ requests. Church theologians, too, doubted her word. Jesus told Faustina that he loved her obedience and that his will would be done in the end.

    In June 1934 an artist completed the painting of the Divine Mercy according to her instructions; and it soon became a focus for devotion. Faustina continued to record in her diary the appearances of Jesus. The diary was translated into English and published in 1987 with the title Divine Mercy in My Soul.

    Faustina, baptized Helena, had grown up in a poor Polish family of 10 children. When she was 15 years old, she quit school in order to work as a housemaid to help support her family. By the time she was 18, she was sure that God was calling her to a religious life, but her parents objected. So she tried to put it out of her mind. But one night, while the lively polka music was playing at a village dance, Helena saw Jesus, sad and suffering. The very next day she packed a small bag and went to the capital city of Warsaw to join the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy. There she received the name Sister Mary Faustina.

    About 10 years later, Faustina contracted tuberculosis. Soon she was too weak to manage the heavy gardening assigned to her. So she was given the job of gatekeeper. She was able to show mercy to the poor people who came to the convent looking for food. Once Jesus came to the door as a poor young man. After he had eaten the soup and bread Faustina gave him, she recognized him. Jesus told her he had come to experience with great joy her tender love and mercy.

    Faustina was canonized by the first Polish pope, John Paul II, on April 30, 2000. The first Sunday after Easter was declared Divine Mercy Sunday.

    Excerpted from Saints and Feast Days: A Resource and Activity Book by The Sisters of Notre Dame of Chardon, Ohio.

    Symbols: young nun in habit; nun with vision of Jesus, with two streams of light, one red and white (Divine Mercy image).

    Things to Do:

    • Read a short biography of Sr. Mary Faustina Kowalska from the Vatican.
    • Read the Holy Father’s April 30, 2000 Homily at the solemn Mass celebrated for the canonization of Sr. Mary Faustina Kowalska.
    • From the Directory on Popular Piety and Liturgy: Devotion to the Divine Mercy

      In connection with the octave of Easter, recent years have witnessed the development and diffusion of a special devotion to the Divine Mercy based on the writings of Sr. Faustina Kowalska who was canonized 30 April 2000. It concentrates on the mercy poured forth in Christ’s death and resurrection, fount of the Holy Spirit who forgives sins and restores joy at having been redeemed. Since the liturgy of the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday — as it is now called — is the natural locus in which to express man’s acceptance of the Redeemer’s mercy, the faithful should be taught to understand this devotion in the light of the liturgical celebrations of these Easter days. Indeed, “the paschal Christ is the definitive incarnation of mercy, his living sign which is both historico-salvific and eschatological. At the same time, the Easter liturgy places the words of the psalm on our lips: “I shall sing forever of the Lord’s mercy” (Ps 89[88]: 2).

    • Read more from our Catholic Culture library about the Divine Mercy devotion, in particular, a short description of The Divine Mercy devotion
    • St. Faustina came from Poland. John Paul II was also Polish, and had a great devotion to the Divine Mercy. He made it a feast day on the second Sunday after Easter. Find out more about Poland and its customs. It’s a very Catholic country, with deep devotion to Our Lady. A wonderful book that gives a wonderful understanding of the culture is the Pope’s biography A Witness to Hope by George Wiegel. This site contains many Polish Traditions. The Polish Art Center has many resources for Polish customs.
    • Try your hand at a Polish dish or two. Perhaps practice making some of the favorite foods for the Polish Wigilia (Christmas Eve Dinner) Pierogi (or Pirohi) is one of the most popular Polish foods, but do some research to find other recipes.

    Memorial of St. Faustina, Virgin (Optional)

    divine mercy jesus & faustina

    Saint Faustina holds a special place in my life because it was to her that the Divine Mercy devotion was privately revealed. It was on Divine Mercy Sunday in New Orleans two years ago when I decided that I could no longer make excuses for remaining outside of the Church. Jesus was calling me back Home and reassuring me of His Mercy and Love for me.
    Read the Bible at Mass

    Reflections from the Saints

    “O Christ, let my greatest delight be to see You loved and Your praise and glory proclaimed, especially the honor of Your mercy. O Christ, let me glorify Your goodness and mercy to the last moment of my life, with every drop of my blood and every beat of my heart. Would that I be transformed into a hymn of adoration of You. When I find myself on my deathbed, may the last beat of my heart be a loving hymn glorifying Your unfathomable mercy.”

    – St. Faustina


    St. Faustina Kowalska, Virgin
    Saint Faustina was born in the 20th century, and canonized in the year 2000. Jesus chose her to deliver to the modern world a message as old as eternity. It is the message of his love for all people, especially sinners. Jesus said to Faustina, “Today I am sending you with my mercy to the people of the whole world.” It is his desire to heal the aching world, to draw all people into his merciful heart of love.

    On February 22, 1931, Jesus appeared to Faustina as the King of Divine Mercy. He asked her to have a picture painted of him as she saw him — clothed in white, with red and white rays of light streaming from his heart. The rays represent the blood and water that flowed from the side of Jesus on the cross. Under the image are the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.”

    Many people did not believe Faustina at first. The sisters in her own convent thought that Jesus could not possibly have selected her for this great favor. After all, she was an uneducated peasant girl. Her superiors often refused to give her permission to carry out Jesus’ requests. Church theologians, too, doubted her word. Jesus told Faustina that he loved her obedience and that his will would be done in the end.

    In June 1934 an artist completed the painting of the Divine Mercy according to her instructions; and it soon became a focus for devotion. Faustina continued to record in her diary the appearances of Jesus. The diary was translated into English and published in 1987 with the title Divine Mercy in My Soul.

    Faustina, baptized Helena, had grown up in a poor Polish family of 10 children. When she was 15 years old, she quit school in order to work as a housemaid to help support her family. By the time she was 18, she was sure that God was calling her to a religious life, but her parents objected. So she tried to put it out of her mind. But one night, while the lively polka music was playing at a village dance, Helena saw Jesus, sad and suffering. The very next day she packed a small bag and went to the capital city of Warsaw to join the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy. There she received the name Sister Mary Faustina.

    About 10 years later, Faustina contracted tuberculosis. Soon she was too weak to manage the heavy gardening assigned to her. So she was given the job of gatekeeper. She was able to show mercy to the poor people who came to the convent looking for food. Once Jesus came to the door as a poor young man. After he had eaten the soup and bread Faustina gave him, she recognized him. Jesus told her he had come to experience with great joy her tender love and mercy.

    Faustina was canonized by the first Polish pope, John Paul II, on April 30, 2000. The first Sunday after Easter was declared Divine Mercy Sunday.

    Excerpted from Saints and Feast Days: A Resource and Activity Book by The Sisters of Notre Dame of Chardon, Ohio.

    Symbols: young nun in habit; nun with vision of Jesus, with two streams of light, one red and white (Divine Mercy image).

    Things to Do:

    • Read a short biography of Sr. Mary Faustina Kowalska from the Vatican.
    • Read the Holy Father’s April 30, 2000 Homily at the solemn Mass celebrated for the canonization of Sr. Mary Faustina Kowalska.
    • From the Directory on Popular Piety and Liturgy: Devotion to the Divine Mercy

      In connection with the octave of Easter, recent years have witnessed the development and diffusion of a special devotion to the Divine Mercy based on the writings of Sr. Faustina Kowalska who was canonized 30 April 2000. It concentrates on the mercy poured forth in Christ’s death and resurrection, fount of the Holy Spirit who forgives sins and restores joy at having been redeemed. Since the liturgy of the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday — as it is now called — is the natural locus in which to express man’s acceptance of the Redee
      mer’s mercy, the faithful should be taught to understand this devotion in the light of the liturgical celebrations of these Easter days. Indeed, “the paschal Christ is the definitive incarnation of mercy, his living sign which is both historico-salvific and eschatological. At the same time, the Easter liturgy places the words of the psalm on our lips: “I shall sing forever of the Lord’s mercy” (Ps 89[88]: 2).

    • Read more from our Catholic Culture library about the Divine Mercy devotion, in particular, a short description of The Divine Mercy devotion
    • St. Faustina came from Poland. John Paul II was also Polish, and had a great devotion to the Divine Mercy. He made it a feast day on the second Sunday after Easter. Find out more about Poland and its customs. It’s a very Catholic country, with deep devotion to Our Lady. A wonderful book that gives a wonderful understanding of the culture is the Pope’s biography A Witness to Hope by George Wiegel. This site contains many Polish Traditions. The Polish Art Center has many resources for Polish customs.
    • Try your hand at a Polish dish or two. Perhaps practice making some of the favorite foods for the Polish Wigilia (Christmas Eve Dinner) Pierogi (or Pirohi) is one of the most popular Polish foods, but do some research to find other recipes.

    Reflecting on Divine Mercy Sunday

    Today’s I had the blessed opportunity to celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday at the National Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother in Portland, Oregon, otherwise known as the Grotto. Construction began in September 1923 and the first Mass was held eight months later in May 1924.

    Much like my first Divine Sunday Mass, participating was a profound experience. The homily of the celebrating priest was poinient and hit home, “How long will you allow yourself to be a slave to the Devil?” This is what the priest wanted to drive home today. And it did for me.

    After the Mass I was fortunate enough to spend time with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. This is a special privalge for the faithful – for those who beleieve in the Fullness of Truth and know and understand that Jesus never left His Church. He is present in every Catholic parish Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity thanks to His Grace and the power of the Holy Spirit who performs the miracle every hour of every day in almost every inhabited place on this earth spins (Malachi 1:11). The Holy Eucharist is the center of Full Christian worship and is something that no Protestant denomination can ever come close to offering or even truly understanding without “swimming the Tiber.”

    After being so close to Our Lord, I walked the grounds of the Grotto and felt the presence of God in amonsgt the images of the faithfuly departed saints and in the very essence of the natural setting that engulfed me. The Grotto itself is an amazing site of beauty and dedication to Our Blessed Mother and the Lord that she and we serve.

     Feel free to flip through the pictures below but keep in mind that this the Grotto is so large a testament to the Glory of God that it took me one hour just to complete the upper level gardens.

    Reflecting on Divine Mercy Sunday

    Today’s I had the blessed opportunity to celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday at the National Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother in Portland, Oregon, otherwise known as the Grotto. Construction began in September 1923 and the first Mass was held eight months later in May 1924.

    Much like my first Divine Sunday Mass, participating was a profound experience. The homily of the celebrating priest was poinient and hit home, “How long will you allow yourself to be a slave to the Devil?” This is what the priest wanted to drive home today. And it did for me.
     
    After the Mass I was fortunate enough to spend time with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. This is a special privalge for the faithful – for those who beleieve in the Fullness of Truth and know and understand that Jesus never left His Church. He is present in every Catholic parish Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity thanks to His Grace and the power of the Holy Spirit who performs the miracle every hour of every day in almost every inhabited place on this earth spins (Malachi 1:11). The Holy Eucharist is the center of Full Christian worship and is something that no Protestant denomination can ever come close to offering or even truly understanding without “swimming the Tiber.”
     
    After being so close to Our Lord, I walked the grounds of the Grotto and felt the presence of God in amonsgt the images of the faithfuly departed saints and in the very essence of the natural setting that engulfed me. The Grotto itself is an amazing site of beauty and dedication to Our Blessed Mother and the Lord that she and we serve.

     Feel free to flip through the pictures below but keep in mind that this the Grotto is so large a testament to the Glory of God that it took me one hour just to complete the upper level gardens.

    Divine Mercy Sunday: Reason for Hope

    Let the sinner know that he will be tortured throughout all eternity, in those senses which he made use of to sin. I am writing this at the command of God, so that no soul may find an excuse by saying there is no hell, or that nobody has ever been there, and so no one can say what it is like…how terribly souls suffer there! Consequently, I pray even more fervently for the conversion of sinners. I incessantly plead God’s mercy upon them. O My Jesus, I would rather be in agony until the end of the world, amidst the greatest sufferings, than offend you by the least sin.” (Diary 741)

    There are many people today who have fallen for the enemy’s greatest deception – namely that hell does not exist. Unfortunately many of those individuals are “Christians” and “Bible-believing Christians” at that! Yet Sacred Scripture is contains many references to this place of eternal damnation.

    On this Divine Mercy Sunday, I wish to remind us all that it is the Grace of Our Lord that will save us it is out of His Mercy that He has stayed His return. The love of God for us is so powerful that He “will[s to] have all men to be saved, and to come to the knowledge of the truth (1 Timothy 2:14).” The Divine Mercy devotion, revealed to Saint Faustina from Our Blessed Lord Himself, is evidence of that.

    Examine the following prayers:

    1. Begin with the Sign of the Cross, 1 Our Father, 1 Hail Mary and The Apostles Creed.

    2. Then on the Our Father Beads say the following: Eternal Father, I offer You the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.
    3. On the 10 Hail Mary Beads say the following: For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world. (Repeat step 2 and 3 for all five decades.)
    4. Conclude with: Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world. (three times)

    The Divine Mercy Chaplet is a prayer, a devotion to the Mercy of Our Lord. It is a pronunciation of our trust in Him and ties directly with Eucharistic Adoration, His Passion and His Sacred Heart:

    Try your best to make the Stations of the Cross in this hour, provided that your duties permit it; and if you are not able to make the Stations of the Cross, then at least step into the chapel for a moment and adore, in the Most Blessed Sacrament. My Heart, which is full of mercy: and should you be unable to step into chapel. immerse yourself in prayer there where you happen to be, if only for a very brief instant. (Diary 1572)

    According to Our Lord, He prefers that we pray this Chaplet at the Hour He died, 3:00pm. That is the hour when the Holy Sacrifice was finished (John 19:30):

    At three o’clock, implore My mercy, especially for sinners; and, if only for a brief moment, immerse yourself in My Passion, particularly in My abandonment at the moment of agony. This is the hour of great mercy … In this hour I will refuse nothing to the soul that makes a request of Me in virtue of My Passion. (Diary 1320).

    At this point you may ask, “What does all this have to do with the reference to hell above?” The reason is because His Mercy is what can keep us from the fires of hell.

    Look at what Saint Faustina wrote about the vision of hell that Jesus permitted her to see

    “Today, I was led by an angel to the Chasms of Hell. It is a place of great torture; how awesomely large and extensive it is! The kinds of tortures I saw:

  • The First Torture that constitutes hell is: The loss of God.
  • The Second is: Perpetual remorse of conscience.
  • The Third is That one’s condition will never change.
  • The Fourth is: The fire that will penetrate the soul without destroying it. A terrible suffering since it is a purely spiritual fire, lit by God’s anger.
  • The Fifth Torture is: Continual darkness and a terrible suffocating smell, and despite the darkness, the devils and the souls of the damned see each other and all the evil, both of others and their own.
  • The Sixth Torture is: The constant company of Satan.
  • The Seventh Torture is: Horrible despair, hatred of God, vile words, curses and blasphemies.
  • These are the Tortures suffered by all the damned together, but that is not the end of the sufferings.

    There are special Tortures destined for particular souls. These are the torments of the senses. Each soul undergoes terrible and indescribable sufferings related to the manner in which it has sinned.

    There are caverns and pits of torture where one form of agony differs from another. I would have died at the very sight of these tortures if the omnipotence of God had not supported me.”

    Yet, let us not despair for as the following prayer for conversion, taught to Saint Faustina by Jesus, gives us even more hope: O Blood and Water which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as Font of Mercy for us, I trust in You!

    Divine Mercy Sunday: Reason for Hope

    Let the sinner know that he will be tortured throughout all eternity, in those senses which he made use of to sin. I am writing this at the command of God, so that no soul may find an excuse by saying there is no hell, or that nobody has ever been there, and so no one can say what it is like…how terribly souls suffer there! Consequently, I pray even more fervently for the conversion of sinners. I incessantly plead God’s mercy upon them. O My Jesus, I would rather be in agony until the end of the world, amidst the greatest sufferings, than offend you by the least sin.” (Diary 741)

    There are many people today who have fallen for the enemy’s greatest deception – namely that hell does not exist. Unfortunately many of those individuals are “Christians” and “Bible-believing Christians” at that! Yet Sacred Scripture is contains many references to this place of eternal damnation.

    On this Divine Mercy Sunday, I wish to remind us all that it is the Grace of Our Lord that will save us it is out of His Mercy that He has stayed His return. The love of God for us is so powerful that He “will[s to] have all men to be saved, and to come to the knowledge of the truth (1 Timothy 2:14).” The Divine Mercy devotion, revealed to Saint Faustina from Our Blessed Lord Himself, is evidence of that.

    Examine the following prayers:

    1. Begin with the Sign of the Cross, 1 Our Father, 1 Hail Mary and The Apostles Creed.
    2. Then on the Our Father Beads say the following: Eternal Father, I offer You the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.
    3. On the 10 Hail Mary Beads say the following: For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world. (Repeat step 2 and 3 for all five decades.)
    4. Conclude with: Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world. (three times)

    The Divine Mercy Chaplet is a prayer, a devotion to the Mercy of Our Lord. It is a pronunciation of our trust in Him and ties directly with Eucharistic Adoration, His Passion and His Sacred Heart:

    Try your best to make the Stations of the Cross in this hour, provided that your duties permit it; and if you are not able to make the Stations of the Cross, then at least step into the chapel for a moment and adore, in the Most Blessed Sacrament. My Heart, which is full of mercy: and should you be unable to step into chapel. immerse yourself in prayer there where you happen to be, if only for a very brief instant. (Diary 1572)

    According to Our Lord, He prefers that we pray this Chaplet at the Hour He died, 3:00pm. That is the hour when the Holy Sacrifice was finished (John 19:30):

    At three o’clock, implore My mercy, especially for sinners; and, if only for a brief moment, immerse yourself in My Passion, particularly in My abandonment at the moment of agony. This is the hour of great mercy … In this hour I will refuse nothing to the soul that makes a request of Me in virtue of My Passion. (Diary 1320).

    At this point you may ask, “What does all this have to do with the reference to hell above?” The reason is because His Mercy is what can keep us from the fires of hell.

    Look at what Saint Faustina wrote about the vision of hell that Jesus permitted her to see

    “Today, I was led by an angel to the Chasms of Hell. It is a place of great torture; how awesomely large and extensive it is! The kinds of tortures I saw:
    • The First Torture that constitutes hell is: The loss of God.
    • The Second is: Perpetual remorse of conscience.
    • The Third is That one’s condition will never change.
    • The Fourth is: The fire that will penetrate the soul without destroying it. A terrible suffering since it is a purely spiritual fire, lit by God’s anger.
    • The Fifth Torture is: Continual darkness and a terrible suffocating smell, and despite the darkness, the devils and the souls of the damned see each other and all the evil, both of others and their own.
    • The Sixth Torture is: The constant company of Satan.
    • The Seventh Torture is: Horrible despair, hatred of God, vile words, curses and blasphemies.
    These are the Tortures suffered by all the damned together, but that is not the end of the sufferings.

    There are special Tortures destined for particular souls. These are the torments of the senses. Each soul undergoes terrible and indescribable sufferings related to the manner in which it has sinned.

    There are caverns and pits of torture where one form of agony differs from another. I would have died at the very sight of these tortures if the omnipotence of God had not supported me.”

    Yet, let us not despair for as the following prayer for conversion, taught to Saint Faustina by Jesus, gives us even more hope: O Blood and Water which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as Font of Mercy for us, I trust in You!