Tag Archives: Evangelism

Memorial of Saint Justin, martyr

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Image via Wikipedia

“As by the Word of God, Jesus our Savior was made Flesh and had both Flesh and Blood for our salvation, so also the food which has been blessed by the word of prayer instituted by Him is both the Flesh and Blood of Jesus Incarnate.”

St. Justin, apologist and martyr, was one of the most important Christian writers of the second century. He himself tells how his study of all the schools of philosophy led him to Christianity, and how he dedicated his life to the defense of the Christian faith as “the one certain and profitable philosophy.”

St. Justin is particularly celebrated for the two Apologies which he was courageous enough to address in succession to the persecuting emperors Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius. One of them contains a description of the rites of baptism and the ceremonies of Mass, thus constituting the most valuable evidence that we possess on the Roman liturgy of his day. He was beheaded in Rome in 165. Justin is also referred to as “the Philosopher.”


READ THE BIBLE AT MASS

First Reading: Acts 17:15, 22—18:1

After Paul’s escorts had taken him to Athens, they came away with instructions for Silas and Timothy to join him as soon as possible.

Then Paul stood up at the Areopagus and said:

“You Athenians, I see that in every respect you are very religious. For as I walked around looking carefully at your shrines, I even discovered an altar inscribed, ‘To an Unknown God.’ What therefore you unknowingly worship, I proclaim to you. The God who made the world and all that is in it, the Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in sanctuaries made by human hands, nor is he served by human hands because he needs anything. Rather it is he who gives to everyone life and breath and everything. He made from one the whole human race to dwell on the entire surface of the earth, and he fixed the ordered seasons and the boundaries of their regions, so that people might seek God, even perhaps grope for him and find him, though indeed he is not far from any one of us. For ‘In him we live and move and have our being,’ as even some of your poets have said, ‘For we too are his offspring.’ Since therefore we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the divinity is like an image fashioned from gold, silver, or stone by human art and imagination. God has overlooked the times of ignorance, but now he demands that all people everywhere repent because he has established a day on which he will ‘judge the world with justice’ through a man he has appointed, and he has provided confirmation for all by raising him from the dead.”

When they heard about resurrection of the dead, some began to scoff, but others said, “We should like to hear you on this some other time.” And so Paul left them. But some did join him, and became believers. Among them were Dionysius, a member of the Court of the Areopagus, a woman named Damaris, and others with them.

After this he left Athens and went to Corinth.

Responsorial Psalm148:1-2, 11-12, 13, 14

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the LORD from the heavens;
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you his angels;
praise him, all you his hosts.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Let the kings of the earth and all peoples,
the princes and all the judges of the earth,
Young men too, and maidens,
old men and boys.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the name of the LORD,
for his name alone is exalted;
His majesty is above earth and heaven.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has lifted up the horn of his people;
Be this his praise from all his faithful ones,
from the children of Israel, the people close to him.
Alleluia.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel: Jn 16:12-15

Jesus said to his disciples:

“I have much more to tell you, but you cannot bear it now. But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth. He will not speak on his own, but he will speak what he hears, and will declare to you the things that are coming. He will glorify me, because he will take from what is mine and declare it to you. Everything that the Father has is mine; for this reason I told you that he will take from what is mine and declare it to you.”


SAINT JUSTIN
Justin, the son of Priscus, was a Greek by race, and was born at Nablus in Palestine. He passed his youth in the study of letters. When he grew to manhood he was so taken with the love of philosophy and the desire of truth, that he became a student of philosphy and examined the teaching of all the philosophers. He found in them only deceitful wisdom and error. He received the light of heaven from a venerable old man, who was a stranger to him, and embraced the philosophy of the true Christian faith. Henceforth he had the books of Holy Scripture in his hands by day and night, and his soul was filled with the divine fire enkindled by his meditations. Having thus acquired the excellent knowledge of Jesus Christ, he devoted his learning to the composition of many books explaining and propagating the Christian faith.

Among the most famous of the works of Justin are his two Apologies or Defenses of the Christian faith. These he offered in the Senate to the Emperor Antoninus Pius and his sons, together with Marcus Antoninus Verus and Lucius Aurelius Commodus, who were cruelly persecuting the followers of Christ. By these Apologies and his vigorous disputations in defense of the faith he obtained a public edict from the government to stay the slaughter of the Christians. But Justin himself did not escape. He had blamed the wicked life led by Crescens the Cynic, who caused him to be accused and arrested. He was brought before Rusticus, the Prefect of Rome, and questioned concerning the doctrine of the Christians. Whereupon he made this good confession in the presence of many witnesses: “The right doctrine which we Christian men do keep with godliness is this: that we believe that there is one God, the maker and creator of all things, both those which are seen and those which bodily eyes do not see; and that we confess the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who was of old foretold by the Prophets, and who is to come to judge all mankind.”

In his first Apology Justin had given, in order to rebut the slanders of the heathen, an open account of the Christian assemblies and of the holy Mysteries there celebrated. The prefect asked him in what place he and Christ’s other faithful servants in the city were accustomed to meet. But Justin, fearing to betray the holy mysteries and his brethren, mentioned only his own dwelling near the famous church in the house of Pudens, where he lived and taught his disciples. The prefect then bade him choose whether he would sacrifice to the gods or suffer a cruel scourging. The unconquered champion of the faith answered that he had always desired to suffer for the Lord Jesus Christ, from whom he hoped to receive a great reward in heaven. The prefect thereupon sentenced him to death, and thus this excellent philosopher, giving praise to God, suffered the pain of scourging, and then shed his blood for Christ, and was crowned with martyrdom. Some of the faithful stole away his body and buried it in a fitting place.

Excerpted from The Liturgical Year, Abbot Gueranger O.S.B.

Patron: Apologists; lecturers; orators; philosophers; speakers.

Symbols: Ox; pen; sword; red-hot helmet.

Things to Do:

  • St. Justin was a prolific writer, and one of the first Christians to write about the Eucharistic liturgy of the early church. Read some of Justin Martyr’s writings.
  • Read this account of St. Justin’s life and another account from the Church Fathers of his martyrdom.
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia has an excellent entry on St. Justin. Their summary: “The role of St. Justin may be summed up in one word: it is that of a witness. We behold in him one of the highest and purest pagan souls of his time in contact with Christianity, compelled to accept its irrefragable truth, its pure moral teaching, and to admire its superhuman constancy. He is also a witness of the second-century Church which he describes for us in its faith, its life, its worship, at a time when Christianity yet lacked the firm organization that it was soon to develop, but the larger outlines of whose constitution and doctrine are already luminously drawn by Justin. Finally, Justin was a witness for Christ unto death.”

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year

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Memorial of Saint Justin, martyr

Justin MartyrImage via Wikipedia

“As by the Word of God, Jesus our Savior was made Flesh and had both Flesh and Blood for our salvation, so also the food which has been blessed by the word of prayer instituted by Him is both the Flesh and Blood of Jesus Incarnate.”

St. Justin, apologist and martyr, was one of the most important Christian writers of the second century. He himself tells how his study of all the schools of philosophy led him to Christianity, and how he dedicated his life to the defense of the Christian faith as “the one certain and profitable philosophy.”

St. Justin is particularly celebrated for the two Apologies which he was courageous enough to address in succession to the persecuting emperors Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius. One of them contains a description of the rites of baptism and the ceremonies of Mass, thus constituting the most valuable evidence that we possess on the Roman liturgy of his day. He was beheaded in Rome in 165. Justin is also referred to as “the Philosopher.”


READ THE BIBLE AT MASS

First Reading: Acts 17:15, 22—18:1

After Paul’s escorts had taken him to Athens, they came away with instructions for Silas and Timothy to join him as soon as possible.

Then Paul stood up at the Areopagus and said:

“You Athenians, I see that in every respect you are very religious. For as I walked around looking carefully at your shrines, I even discovered an altar inscribed, ‘To an Unknown God.’ What therefore you unknowingly worship, I proclaim to you. The God who made the world and all that is in it, the Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in sanctuaries made by human hands, nor is he served by human hands because he needs anything. Rather it is he who gives to everyone life and breath and everything. He made from one the whole human race to dwell on the entire surface of the earth, and he fixed the ordered seasons and the boundaries of their regions, so that people might seek God, even perhaps grope for him and find him, though indeed he is not far from any one of us. For ‘In him we live and move and have our being,’ as even some of your poets have said, ‘For we too are his offspring.’ Since therefore we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the divinity is like an image fashioned from gold, silver, or stone by human art and imagination. God has overlooked the times of ignorance, but now he demands that all people everywhere repent because he has established a day on which he will ‘judge the world with justice’ through a man he has appointed, and he has provided confirmation for all by raising him from the dead.”

When they heard about resurrection of the dead, some began to scoff, but others said, “We should like to hear you on this some other time.” And so Paul left them. But some did join him, and became believers. Among them were Dionysius, a member of the Court of the Areopagus, a woman named Damaris, and others with them.

After this he left Athens and went to Corinth.

Responsorial Psalm148:1-2, 11-12, 13, 14

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the LORD from the heavens;
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you his angels;
praise him, all you his hosts.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Let the kings of the earth and all peoples,
the princes and all the judges of the earth,
Young men too, and maidens,
old men and boys.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Praise the name of the LORD,
for his name alone is exalted;
His majesty is above earth and heaven.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has lifted up the horn of his people;
Be this his praise from all his faithful ones,
from the children of Israel, the people close to him.
Alleluia.

R. Heaven and earth are full of your glory.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel: Jn 16:12-15

Jesus said to his disciples:

“I have much more to tell you, but you cannot bear it now. But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth. He will not speak on his own, but he will speak what he hears, and will declare to you the things that are coming. He will glorify me, because he will take from what is mine and declare it to you. Everything that the Father has is mine; for this reason I told you that he will take from what is mine and declare it to you.”


SAINT JUSTIN
Justin, the son of Priscus, was a Greek by race, and was born at Nablus in Palestine. He passed his youth in the study of letters. When he grew to manhood he was so taken with the love of philosophy and the desire of truth, that he became a student of philosphy and examined the teaching of all the philosophers. He found in them only deceitful wisdom and error. He received the light of heaven from a venerable old man, who was a stranger to him, and embraced the philosophy of the true Christian faith. Henceforth he had the books of Holy Scripture in his hands by day and night, and his soul was filled with the divine fire enkindled by his meditations. Having thus acquired the excellent knowledge of Jesus Christ, he devoted his learning to the composition of many books explaining and propagating the Christian faith.

Among the most famous of the works of Justin are his two Apologies or Defenses of the Christian faith. These he offered in the Senate to the Emperor Antoninus Pius and his sons, together with Marcus Antoninus Verus and Lucius Aurelius Commodus, who were cruelly persecuting the followers of Christ. By these Apologies and his vigorous disputations in defense of the faith he obtained a public edict from the government to stay the slaughter of the Christians. But Justin himself did not escape. He had blamed the wicked life led by Crescens the Cynic, who caused him to be accused and arrested. He was brought before Rusticus, the Prefect of Rome, and questioned concerning the doctrine of the Christians. Whereupon he made this good confession in the presence of many witnesses: “The right doctrine which we Christian men do keep with godliness is this: that we believe that there is one God, the maker and creator of all things, both those which are seen and those which bodily eyes do not see; and that we confess the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who was of old foretold by the Prophets, and who is to come to judge all mankind.”

In his first Apology Justin had given, in order to rebut the slanders of the heathen, an open account of the Christian assemblies and of the holy Mysteries there celebrated. The prefect asked him in what place he and Christ’s other faithful servants in the city were accustomed to meet. But Justin, fearing to betray the holy mysteries and his brethren, mentioned only his own dwelling near the famous church in the house of Pudens, where he lived and taught his disciples. The prefect then bade him choose whether he would sacrifice to the gods or suffer a cruel scourging. The unconquered champion of the faith answered that he had always desired to suffer for the Lord Jesus Christ, from whom he hoped to receive a great reward in heaven. The prefect thereupon sentenced him to death, and thus this excellent philosopher, giving praise to God, suffered the pain of scourging, and then shed his blood for Christ, and was crowned with martyrdom. Some of the faithful stole away his body and buried it in a fitting place.

Excerpted from The Liturgical Year, Abbot Gueranger O.S.B.

Patron: Apologists; lecturers; orators; philosophers; speakers.

Symbols: Ox; pen; sword; red-hot helmet.

Things to Do:

  • St. Justin was a prolific writer, and one of the first Christians to write about the Eucharistic liturgy of the early church. Read some of Justin Martyr’s writings.
  • Read this account of St. Justin’s life and another account from the Church Fathers of his martyrdom.
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia has an excellent entry on St. Justin. Their summary: “The role of St. Justin may be summed up in one word: it is that of a witness. We behold in him one of the highest and purest pagan souls of his time in contact with Christianity, compelled to accept its irrefragable truth, its pure moral teaching, and to admire its superhuman constancy. He is also a witness of the second-century Church which he describes for us in its faith, its life, its worship, at a time when Christianity yet lacked the firm organization that it was soon to develop, but the larger outlines of whose constitution and doctrine are already luminously drawn by Justin. Finally, Justin was a witness for Christ unto death.”

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year

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Optional Memorial of St. Blaise, Bishop and Martyr

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Statue of Saint Blaise, patron saint of Dubrovnik. Image via Wikipedia.

Today the world celebrates the optional memorial of the saint with what is quite possibly the coolest name of all the canonized saints: Blaise. When I first heard of St. Blaise my mind could not help but equate the name to that of Wu-Tang Clan rapper Method Man who sometimes refers to himself as Johnny Blaze. That then led to Johnny Blaze, the alter-ego of the Ghost Rider.

All of this “blazing” made me wonder if this saint was truly one who could be characterized as being “on fire.” Yes, one can say that every saint is an “on fire” Christian but some are more ablaze, or charismatic, that others. From the brief account presented to us by CatholicCulture.org we can really see that St. Blaise truly lives up to the sound of his name.


St. Blaise
St. Blaise was a physician and Bishop of Sebaste, Armenia. He lived in a cave on Mount Argeus and was a healer of men and animals. According to legend, sick animals would come to him on their own for help, but would never disturb him at prayer.

Agricola, governor of Cappadocia, came to Sebaste to persecute Christians. His huntsmen went into the forests of Argeus to find wild animals for the arena games, and found many waiting outside Blaise’s cave. Discovered in prayer, Blaise was arrested, and Agricola tried to get him to recant his faith. While in prison, Blaise ministered to and healed fellow prisoners, including saving a child who was choking on a fish bone; this led to the blessing of throats on Blaise’s feast day.

Thrown into a lake to drown, Blaise stood on the surface and invited his persecutors to walk out and prove the power of their gods; they drowned. When he returned to land, he was martyred by being beaten, his flesh torn with wool combs (which led to his association with and patronage of those involved in the wool trade), and then beheading.

Blaise has been extremely popular for centuries in both the Eastern and Western Churches and many cures were attributed to him, notably that of a child who was suffocating through a fish bone being caught in his throat. In 1222 the Council of Oxford prohibited servile labour in England on his feast. He is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. He is invoked for all throat afflictions, and on his feast two candles are blessed with a prayer that God will free from all such afflictions and every ill all those who receive this blessing.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

It is customary in many places to bless the throats of the faithful with two candles tied together with a red ribbon to form a cross. The rite of the blessing of throats may take place before or after Mass.

The priest or deacon places the candles around the throat of whoever seeks the blessing, using the formula: “Through the intercession of St. Blaise, bishop and martyr, may God deliver you free from every disease of the throat, and from every other disease. In the name of the Father and of the Son, + and of the Holy Spirit. R. Amen.”

Excerpted from Ceremonies of the Liturgical Year

Patron: Against wild beasts; animals; builders; carvers; construction workers; coughs; Dalmatia; Dubrovnik; goiters; healthy throats; stonecutters; throat diseases; veterinarians; whooping-cough; wool-combers; wool weavers.

Symbols: 2 candles; 2 crossed candles; candle; hermit tending wild animals; iron comb; man healing a choking boy; man with two candles; wax; wool comb.

Things to Do:

  • Take your children to Mass to receive the blessing of throats today.
  • Establish a home altar with the blessed candles (symbols of Saint Blaise) from the feast of the Presentation, February 2.
  • Visit this website and learn more about St. Blaise and how he saved Dubrovnik in Croatia in the 12th century.

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year.


Today’s Scripture Readings

First Reading: Hebrews 12:18-19, 21-24 (RSV)

Brothers and Sisters:

For you have not come to what may be touched, a blazing fire, and darkness, and gloom, and a tempest, and the sound of a trumpet, and a voice whose words made the hearers entreat that no further messages be spoken to them. Indeed, so terrifying was the sight that Moses said, “I tremble with fear.” But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable angels in festal gathering, and to the assembly of the first-born who are enrolled in heaven, and to a judge who is God of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect, and to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood that speaks more graciously than the blood of Abel.

Psalm: Psalm 48:2-4, 9-11 (NAB)

R. (see 10) O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

Great is the LORD and wholly to be praised
in the city of our God.
His holy mountain, fairest of heights,
is the joy of all the earth.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

Mount Zion, “the recesses of the North,”
the city of the great King.
God is with her castles;
renowned is he as a stronghold.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

As we had heard, so have we seen
in the city of the LORD of hosts,
In the city of our God;
God makes it firm forever.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

O God, we ponder your mercy
within your temple.
As your name, O God, so also your praise
reaches to the ends of the earth.
Of justice your right hand is full.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

Gospel: Mark 6:7-13 (RSV)

And he called to him the twelve, and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. He charged them to take nothing for their journey except a staff; no bread, no bag, no money in their belts; but to wear sandals and not put on two tunics. And he said to them, “Where you enter a house, stay there until you leave the place. And if any place will not receive you and they refuse to hear you, when you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet for a testimony against them.” So they went out and preached that men should repent. And they cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many that were sick and healed them.

Optional Memorial of St. Blaise, Bishop and Martyr

Statue de Saint Blaise Saint Patron de Dubrovnik

Today the world celebrates the optional memorial of the saint with what is quite possibly the coolest name of all the canonized saints: Blaise. When I first heard of St. Blaise my mind could not help but equate the name to that of Wu-Tang Clan rapper Method Man who sometimes refers to himself as Johnny Blaze. That then led to Johnny Blaze, the alter-ego of the Ghost Rider.

All of this “blazing” made me wonder if this saint was truly one who could be characterized as being “on fire.” Yes, one can say that every saint is an “on fire” Christian but some are more ablaze, or charismatic, that others. From the brief account presented to us by CatholicCulture.org we can really see that St. Blaise truly lives up to the sound of his name.


St. Blaise
St. Blaise was a physician and Bishop of Sebaste, Armenia. He lived in a cave on Mount Argeus and was a healer of men and animals. According to legend, sick animals would come to him on their own for help, but would never disturb him at prayer.

Agricola, governor of Cappadocia, came to Sebaste to persecute Christians. His huntsmen went into the forests of Argeus to find wild animals for the arena games, and found many waiting outside Blaise’s cave. Discovered in prayer, Blaise was arrested, and Agricola tried to get him to recant his faith. While in prison, Blaise ministered to and healed fellow prisoners, including saving a child who was choking on a fish bone; this led to the blessing of throats on Blaise’s feast day.

Thrown into a lake to drown, Blaise stood on the surface and invited his persecutors to walk out and prove the power of their gods; they drowned. When he returned to land, he was martyred by being beaten, his flesh torn with wool combs (which led to his association with and patronage of those involved in the wool trade), and then beheading.

Blaise has been extremely popular for centuries in both the Eastern and Western Churches and many cures were attributed to him, notably that of a child who was suffocating through a fish bone being caught in his throat. In 1222 the Council of Oxford prohibited servile labour in England on his feast. He is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. He is invoked for all throat afflictions, and on his feast two candles are blessed with a prayer that God will free from all such afflictions and every ill all those who receive this blessing.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

It is customary in many places to bless the throats of the faithful with two candles tied together with a red ribbon to form a cross. The rite of the blessing of throats may take place before or after Mass.

The priest or deacon places the candles around the throat of whoever seeks the blessing, using the formula: “Through the intercession of St. Blaise, bishop and martyr, may God deliver you free from every disease of the throat, and from every other disease. In the name of the Father and of the Son, + and of the Holy Spirit. R. Amen.”

Excerpted from Ceremonies of the Liturgical Year

Patron: Against wild beasts; animals; builders; carvers; construction workers; coughs; Dalmatia; Dubrovnik; goiters; healthy throats; stonecutters; throat diseases; veterinarians; whooping-cough; wool-combers; wool weavers.

Symbols: 2 candles; 2 crossed candles; candle; hermit tending wild animals; iron comb; man healing a choking boy; man with two candles; wax; wool comb.

Things to Do:

  • Take your children to Mass to receive the blessing of throats today.
  • Establish a home altar with the blessed candles (symbols of Saint Blaise) from the feast of the Presentation, February 2.
  • Visit this website and learn more about St. Blaise and how he saved Dubrovnik in Croatia in the 12th century.

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year.


Today’s Scripture Readings

First Reading: Hebrews 12:18-19, 21-24 (RSV)

Brothers and Sisters:

For you have not come to what may be touched, a blazing fire, and darkness, and gloom, and a tempest, and the sound of a trumpet, and a voice whose words made the hearers entreat that no further messages be spoken to them. Indeed, so terrifying was the sight that Moses said, “I tremble with fear.” But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable angels in festal gathering, and to the assembly of the first-born who are enrolled in heaven, and to a judge who is God of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect, and to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood that speaks more graciously than the blood of Abel.

Psalm: Psalm 48:2-4, 9-11 (NAB)

R. (see 10) O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

Great is the LORD and wholly to be praised
in the city of our God.
His holy mountain, fairest of heights,
is the joy of all the earth.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

Mount Zion, “the recesses of the North,”
the city of the great King.
God is with her castles;
renowned is he as a stronghold.

R. O God, we
ponder your mercy within your temple.

As we had heard, so have we seen
in the city of the LORD of hosts,
In the city of our God;
God makes it firm forever.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

O God, we ponder your mercy
within your temple.
As your name, O God, so also your praise
reaches to the ends of the earth.
Of justice your right hand is full.

R. O God, we ponder your mercy within your temple.

Gospel: Mark 6:7-13 (RSV)

And he called to him the twelve, and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. He charged them to take nothing for their journey except a staff; no bread, no bag, no money in their belts; but to wear sandals and not put on two tunics. And he said to them, “Where you enter a house, stay there until you leave the place. And if any place will not receive you and they refuse to hear you, when you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet for a testimony against them.” So they went out and preached that men should repent. And they cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many that were sick and healed them.

Yes, There Are Hebrew Catholics

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Our Mother of Perpetual Help, a 15th Century Marian Byzantine Icon. Image via Wikipedia.

The following excerpts come from a post that Catholic author Taylor Marshall did after a speaking at the Annual Hebrew Catholic Conference held in Saint Louis, Missouri back in September of this year. Hebrew Catholics are, what I consider to be, the totality of Catholicism. These devout men and women are ethnically Jewish and live the fulfillment of Judaism, which is found in Christ and the Church He established over 2,000 years ago.

…the Hebrew Catholics that I met love Christ passionately. Roy Shoeman broke out tears as he exhorted everyone to evangelize their Jewish friends and pray for their entry into the Catholic Church through baptism and the sacraments. Mankind can only find peace and salvation in Jesus, said Shoeman, even more so the Jew, whose Scriptures teach him to hope for a Messiah. If the Jew cannot have this desire quenched – he is to be pitied more than all other men. He expressed his fear that many Catholics wrongly assume that Jews dont really need Jesus, and how dreadful it will be on Judgment Day for those of us who squandered opportunities to kindly evangelize our Jewish friends and neighbors.

……

Also, I perceived a deep love for traditional liturgy. Their Holy Mass that I attended was mostly in Latin and chanted (block notes-medieval neumes in the bulletin). Only the readings and canon were in English–everything very reverent. The Jews are a liturgical people and this is expressed in their worship. The celebrant who was himself, I believe, ethnically Jewish, processed in and out in a biretta. He celebrated the Roman Canon and invoked all the saints of the canon without skipping over a single one. A truly beautiful celebration of the Holy Mass. The sermon was also excellent.

……

They also have a special love and devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. There is among them an intense devotion to the Miraculous Medal. It seems like everyone was wearing the Miraculous Medal. The reason for this is the miraculous conversion of the 19th century Jewish manAlphonse Ratisbonne who wore the Miraculous Medal on a dare. As he wore the Miraculous Medal, the Immaculate Mary appeared to him. Ratisbonne subsequently received baptism and was later ordained as a Catholic priest. Hence, our Immaculate Lady is integral to the Hebrew Catholic ethos.

……..

Last of all, they love Sacred Scripture. Everyone seemed fluent in the Bible, and there was great attention paid to the Scriptures. Dr. Lawrence Feingold gave a profound presentation with Scriptural citations throughout. And they aren’t wishy-washy about the Bible by compromising with liberal (so-called) scholarship. They love the Bible and it is the air that they breathe.

via Here Come the Hebrew Catholics ~ Canterbury Tales by Taylor Marshall.

Yes, There Are Hebrew Catholics

Our Mother of Perpetual Help, a 15th Century M...

The following excerpts come from a post that Catholic author Taylor Marshall did after a speaking at the Annual Hebrew Catholic Conference held in Saint Louis, Missouri back in September of this year. Hebrew Catholics are, what I consider to be, the totality of Catholicism. These devout men and women are ethnically Jewish and live the fulfillment of Judaism, which is found in Christ and the Church He established over 2,000 years ago.

…the Hebrew Catholics that I met love Christ passionately. Roy Shoeman broke out tears as he exhorted everyone to evangelize their Jewish friends and pray for their entry into the Catholic Church through baptism and the sacraments. Mankind can only find peace and salvation in Jesus, said Shoeman, even more so the Jew, whose Scriptures teach him to hope for a Messiah. If the Jew cannot have this desire quenched – he is to be pitied more than all other men. He expressed his fear that many Catholics wrongly assume that Jews dont really need Jesus, and how dreadful it will be on Judgment Day for those of us who squandered opportunities to kindly evangelize our Jewish friends and neighbors.

……

Also, I perceived a deep love for traditional liturgy. Their Holy Mass that I attended was mostly in Latin and chanted (block notes-medieval neumes in the bulletin). Only the readings and canon were in English—everything very reverent. The Jews are a liturgical people and this is expressed in their worship. The celebrant who was himself, I believe, ethnically Jewish, processed in and out in a biretta. He celebrated the Roman Canon and invoked all the saints of the canon without skipping over a single one. A truly beautiful celebration of the Holy Mass. The sermon was also excellent.

……

They also have a special love and devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. There is among them an intense devotion to the Miraculous Medal. It seems like everyone was wearing the Miraculous Medal. The reason for this is the miraculous conversion of the 19th century Jewish manAlphonse Ratisbonne who wore the Miraculous Medal on a dare. As he wore the Miraculous Medal, the Immaculate Mary appeared to him. Ratisbonne subsequently received baptism and was later ordained as a Catholic priest. Hence, our Immaculate Lady is integral to the Hebrew Catholic ethos.

……..

Last of all, they love Sacred Scripture. Everyone seemed fluent in the Bible, and there was great attention paid to the Scriptures. Dr. Lawrence Feingold gave a profound presentation with Scriptural citations throughout. And they aren’t wishy-washy about the Bible by compromising with liberal (so-called) scholarship. They love the Bible and it is the air that they breathe.

via Here Come the Hebrew Catholics ~ Canterbury Tales by Taylor Marshall.

Reflections from the Saints: Polycarp on Salvation by Grace

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You never saw Him, and yet believe in Him with sublime and inexpressible joy – a joy which many desire to experience. You are assured that you have been saved by a gratuitous gift, not by our actions – no, but by the will of God through Jesus Christ.

– St. Polycarp

via myCatholic.com » Customizable Catholic Homepage.

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Reflections from the Saints: Polycarp on Salvation by Grace

Polycarp
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You never saw Him, and yet believe in Him with sublime and inexpressible joy – a joy which many desire to experience. You are assured that you have been saved by a gratuitous gift, not by our actions – no, but by the will of God through Jesus Christ.

– St. Polycarp

via myCatholic.com » Customizable Catholic Homepage.

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One Minute Meditations: Will

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“There are three important things you need to do to draw people to God. Forget yourself, and think only of the glory of your Father God. Subject your will filially to the Will of Heaven, as Jesus Christ taught you. Follow with docility the lights of the Holy Spirit.”

St. Josemaria Escriva, Furrow, #793

One Minute Meditations: Will

Holy Spirit dove window

“There are three important things you need to do to draw people to God. Forget yourself, and think only of the glory of your Father God. Subject your will filially to the Will of Heaven, as Jesus Christ taught you. Follow with docility the lights of the Holy Spirit.”

St. Josemaria Escriva, Furrow, #793