Tag Archives: God

Noah’s Ark Replica Built in Netherlands

In connection with the story I posted yesterday about evidence being found for the Great Flood, here is a story on the replica that was the featured image of said post.

 

He may have trouble finding two animals of every kind, but Johan Huibers of the Netherlands isn’t one to be dissuaded.

After 20 years, the professional builder completed his goal of building a full-scale, fully-operational version of Noah’s Ark, using Genesis, books 6-9, in The Bible as his guide.

Huibers converted cubits to modern measurements to pull off the feat, reports the Associated Press, leading to an impressive wooden vessel that is 427 feet long, 95 feet wide and 75 feet high.

But just to be clear, the Dutchman, a Christian, is not expecting a flood of Biblical proportions anytime soon.

“I had a call from American television,” he told AP with a laugh. “This has nothing to do with the end of the Mayan calendar.”

Instead, citing what The Bible predicts might be in store for Earth, Huibers says, “I want to make people question that so that they go looking for answers.” He also hopes people will ultimately find salvation through God and eternal life.

Noah's Ark, oil on canvas painting by Edward H...
Noah’s Ark, oil on canvas painting by Edward Hicks, 1846 Philadelphia Museum of Art (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And while the ark is not currently occupied with multitudes of four-legged creatures – though there are reportedly some plastic and stuffed replicas of larger species onboard for atmosphere – there is a small petting zoo with ponies, dogs, sheep, rabbits and exotic birds aboard the ship, which is moored just south of Rotterdam, as well as a restaurant and movie theater that can seat 50.

See more photos inside the ark on CNN.com.

 

via Noah’s Ark Replica Built by Man in Netherlands : People.com.

 

What I find most interesting, aside from the accomplishment itself, is that I found this story on People’s People Pets section. Go figure.

 

 

 

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FoundNation » Universal

I was fortunate to discover this group while listening to the Catholic Rockers podcast, produced by SQPN. In any event, as has been my experience with most “praise” Catholic musicians they bring every experience the Lord has allowed them to the table in his honor and leave nothing to be desired.

FoundNation is more than just a rap group. It is a group of men, driven by their Christian identity, to serve others, and make God known to them through their lives and their music.

This new group that spans to all the borders of the United States is not only bringing a new sound to Christian rap but is also setting a high bar for catholic rap. The 3 artists with the stage names of Thot, Dy-verse, and C2six have many years of ministry, from the local level of parish ministry with CCD and catechetical teachers to street ministry with gang intervention and street witnessing. After pursuing solo careers in the hip-hop world, they crossed paths through the indie Catholic rap label Phatmass, and quickly bonded as artists and friends. Desiring to bring change to the lives of individuals, their communities, and their own personal lives as they continuously sought to live out their Catholic-Christian faith, these young men became the group called FoundNation.

With their individual talents, they seek to bring light into a dark world, through rhymes, beats and songs. The sounds represented from the group come from “tha South” and also from a “latin” rap mixed with a “now-pop” sound, the music is definitely engineered for our street youth but enjoyable for all ages and backgrounds.

Check them out:


FoundNation » Universal
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3:10 to Yuma – 3:00 to Divine Mercy

Cover of "3:10 to Yuma (Widescreen Editio...
Cover of 3:10 to Yuma (Widescreen Edition)

Okay, the title of the post may not completely make sense but whatever – it’s my blog and I like it.

Anyway, I just finished watching the remake of 3:10 to Yuma starring Russell Crowe and Christian Bale and found it phenomenal and spiritually rich. At the moment I cannot recall the ratings for the film upon its release but because it is a Western and I am partial to that genre.

There is so much to the Western. For me the American cowboy is for the US what the knight is for the UK. And with that idealization comes much in the way of what makes those stories and characters great and timeless – that is chivalry and self-sacrifice. 3:10 was certainly no different in my eyes.

With Crowe as the antagonist Ben Wade, we find an extremely charismatic villain whose love of creating art betrays his reputation like an atoll betrays the expanse of the open ocean. On the flip side, Bale’s protagonist Dan Evans, is one whose own dignity is seemingly borders on stubborn pride as he remains set on seeing out his choices to the end despite what appeared to me as doubt in said choices and even himself.

However, as the film crescendos towards the final scene there are breaks of what I would call examples of God’s Divine Mercy and the alleviation of Evans’ internal sufferings which stem from internal doubt. The doubt and possibly guilt that many a good father carries with them when they feel that they cannot and have not provided for their families. Add that to an injury gained on the battle field but not by the “courageous” fight against the enemy but from a fellow soldier via what we now call “friendly fire.” How many veterans return home from the front with an injury and barely a prospect to support themselves or their families?

The first of these glimpse of Mercy begins with the fact that Even decides to make a seemingly foolish decision to risk his life and that of his family to bring in Wade for $200 – just enough to skin by. This exhibits a man who is not greedy but desperate, involving himself where he has no obligation.

Despite this Evans survives where other die and his life is spared by the murderous outlaw Wade on more than one occasion – again, displaying the fact that Wade certainly has a moral compass – a conscience though malformed and crooked. Together both good and bad (not so bad) begin to see and understand each other in a way that, as evidenced in the scene at the train station, one could speculate that the two may have been friends were their paths slightly different. On the one hand Wade begins to respect Evans as a man of integrity and honor as the father proves that he did not ultimately choose to escort Wade to the train as a payout but rather as a way to show his oldest son that his father is a man integrity and of self-sacrifice. Wade now understands why he would turn down the $1000 he offered Evans while getting Mr. Butterfield, the railroad man, to promise that very amount simply because he “was the only to take Wade to the train when others wouldn’t.”

On top of that, the entire exchange concerning payoffs took place rain came down upon the drought-ridden town of Brisby, which eliminated, in the eyes of Wade, the monetary purpose for Evans choice. To me it seemed that the rain washed away the weight of doubt off the back of Evans and reinforced what faith he had in God. And no knowing that the his family was more than taken cared of – he was free to make good on his word for the simple reason that it was his word and that he was doing what he could to obtain justice for many who fell at the barrel of Wades revolver. A revolver that interestingly enough, played what was perhaps the most important part of the ending scene — giving us a glimpses of how Christ crucified joined with the selfless act of Evans brought hope and a shimmer of redemption to a violent villain.

Of course a film made today must show that the bad guy remains bad (thus Wade calls on his trusty steed) but I could certainly see that the director intended the Crucifix on the handle of Wade’s gun to be the equating factor for Wade “somewhat” redeeming himself. And through those last moments the audience knew that Evans would not have made the journey without the aid of Wade. It almost reminded me of Simon of Cyrene  helping Jesus with His cross. The man wanted nothing to do with it but seeing that this was not only his redemption but the redemption of the entire human race – how could he not have joined willingly after a little prodding initially?

I know much of what I say can be considered a stretch but for me I see examples of God’s Mercy and Love in our dramatic tales in print and on stage and screen. It is written in our hearts.

Optional Memorial of St. Maria Goretti, virgin and martyr

St. Maria Goretti (painting 1929)

Oh Saint Maria Goretti who, strengthened by God’s grace, did not hesitate even at the age of twelve to shed your blood and sacrifice life itself to defend your virginal purity, look graciously on the unhappy human race which has strayed far from the path of eternal salvation. Teach us all, and especially youth,with what courage and promptitude we should flee for the love of Jesus anything that could offend Him or stain our souls with sin. Obtain for us from our Lord victory in temptation, comfort in the sorrows of life, and the grace which we earnestly beg of thee (here insert intention), and may we one day enjoy with thee the imperishable glory of Heaven. Amen.

— Prayer to St. Maria Goretti


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Gn 41:55-57; 42:5-7a, 17-24a

When hunger came to be felt throughout the land of Egypt and the people cried to Pharaoh for bread, Pharaoh directed all the Egyptians to go to Joseph and do whatever he told them. When the famine had spread throughout the land, Joseph opened all the cities that had grain and rationed it to the Egyptians, since the famine had gripped the land of Egypt. In fact, all the world came to Joseph to obtain rations of grain, for famine had gripped the whole world.

The sons of Israel were among those who came to procure rations.

It was Joseph, as governor of the country, who dispensed the rations to all the people. When Joseph’s brothers came and knelt down before him with their faces to the ground, he recognized them as soon as he saw them. But Joseph concealed his own identity from them and spoke sternly to them.

With that, he locked them up in the guardhouse for three days.

On the third day Joseph said to his brothers:

“Do this, and you shall live; for I am a God-fearing man. If you have been honest, only one of your brothers need be confined in this prison, while the rest of you may go and take home provisions for your starving families. But you must come back to me with your youngest brother. Your words will thus be verified, and you will not die.”

To this they agreed. To one another, however, they said:

“Alas, we are being punished because of our brother. We saw the anguish of his heart when he pleaded with us, yet we paid no heed; that is why this anguish has now come upon us.”

Reuben broke in, “Did I not tell you not to do wrong to the boy? But you would not listen! Now comes the reckoning for his blood.” The brothers did not know, of course, that Joseph understood what they said, since he spoke with them through an interpreter. But turning away from them, he wept.

Responsorial Psalm33:2-3, 10-11, 18-19

R. (22) Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

Give thanks to the LORD on the harp;
with the ten-stringed lyre chant his praises.
Sing to him a new song;
pluck the strings skillfully, with shouts of gladness.

R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

The LORD brings to nought the plans of nations;
he foils the designs of peoples.
But the plan of the LORD stands forever;
the design of his heart, through all generations.

R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

But see, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,
upon those who hope for his kindness,
To deliver them from death
and preserve them in spite of famine.

R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.


Gospel Reading: Mt 10:1-7

Jesus summoned his Twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits to drive them out and to cure every disease and every illness. The names of the Twelve Apostles are these:

First, Simon called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James, the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddeus; Simon the Cananean, and Judas Iscariot who betrayed Jesus.

Jesus sent out these Twelve after instructing them thus, “Do not go into pagan territory or enter a Samaritan town. Go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, make this proclamation: ‘The Kingdom of heaven is at hand.’”


About St. Maria Goretti

St. Maria Goretti was born of a poor family in Corinaldi, Italy, in 1890. Near Nettuno she spent a difficult childhood assisting her mother in domestic duties. She was of a pious nature and often at prayer. In 1902 she was stabbed to death, preferring to die rather than be raped. (Office of Readings)

“It is well known how this young girl had to face a bitter struggle with no way to defend herself. Without warning a vicious stranger (actually Alessandro Serenelli who lived with his father in the same house as the Goretti’s.) burst upon her, bent on raping her and destroying her childlike purity. In that moment of crisis she could have spoken to her Redeemer in the words of that classic, The Imitation of Christ: “Though tested and plagued by a host of misfortunes, I have no fear so long as your grace is with me. It is my strength, stronger than any adversary; it helps me and gives me guidance.” With splendid courage she surrendered herself to God and his grace and so gave her life to protect her virginity.

“The life of this simple girl—I shall concern myself only with highlights—we can see as worthy of heaven. Even today people can look upon it with admiration and respect. Parents can learn from her story how to raise their God-given children in virtue, courage and holiness; they can learn to train them in the Catholic faith so that, when put to the test, God’s grace will support them and they will come through undefeated, unscathed and untarnished.

“From Maria’s story carefree children and young people with their zest for life can learn not to be led astray by attractive pleasures which are not only ephemeral and empty but also sinful. Instead they can fix their sights on achieving Christian moral perfection, however difficult and hazardous that course may prove. With determination and God’s help all of us can attain that goal by persistent effort and prayer.

“Not all of us are expected to die a martyr’s death, but we are all called to the pursuit of Christian virtue. This demands strength of character though it may not match that of this innocent girl. Still, a constant, persistent and relentless effort is asked of us right up to the moment of our death. This may be conceived as a slow steady martyrdom which Christ urged upon us when he said: The kingdom of heaven is set upon and laid waste by violent forces.

“So let us all, with God’s grace, strive to reach the goal that the example of the virgin martyr, Saint Maria Goretti, sets before us. Through her prayers to the Redeemer may all of us, each in his own way, joyfully try to follow the inspiring example of Maria Goretti who now enjoys eternal happiness in heaven.”

Excerpted from a homily at the canonization of Saint Maria Goretti by Pope Pius XII

Patron: Against impoverishment; against poverty; children; children of Mary; girls; loss of parents; martyrs; rape victims; young people in general.

Things to Do:

  • Please visit this site for a more detailed account of St. Maria Goretti’s life and Alessandro Serenelli’s conversion.
  • This saint’s feast day is a wonderful launching point to teach our children about purity, chastity and modesty. Sex education should be taught by the parents with a Catholic approach. Young girls can use St. Maria as a model.
  • A highly recommended book is St. Maria Goretti: In Garments All Red by Rev. Godfrey Poage. Young teens to adult will enjoy this account of her life.

via Catholic Culture

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Prayer to Mary, Mother of Women Hurt by Abortion

La vierge aux raisins
Image via Wikipedia

Mary of Bethlehem and Nazareth,
  wife of Joseph,
Virgin mother of the Son of God made man,
  woman of sorrows, model of Faith,
You are our mother,
  living now in the joy of God’s presence.
You watch over each one of us
  with gentleness, compassion and tenderness.

We entrust all women hurt by abortion, and their
aborted children, to your motherly care.
May your unfailing love console our sisters,
  reassure them of their dignity, and be for them a
  source of healing, peace and joy. May they find
  comfort knowing their children are in your arms.

Protect and bless the work
  of women hurt by abortion.
Let it bring love and healing
  to your wounded daughters, and understanding
  to those who would help them.
May its members work with courage, dedication and
  perseverance to protect all women from the horror
  of aborting their children.

And may we all be united again with you in the
  presence of your Son, Jesus Christ, Our Lord.

Amen.

©1992 Human Life International

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Optional Memorial of the First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Martyrs of Rome

“It was through envy and jealousy that the greatest and most upright pillars of the Church were persecuted and struggled unto death…. First of all, Peter, who because of unreasonable jealousy suffered not merely once or twice but many times, and, having thus given his witness, went to the place of glory that he deserved. It was through jealousy and conflict that Paul showed the way to the prize for perseverance. He was put in chains seven times, sent into exile, and stoned; a herald both in the east and the west, he achieved a noble fame by his faith….”

“Around these men with their holy lives there are gathered a great throng of the elect, who, though victims of jealousy, gave us the finest example of endurance in the midst of many indignities and tortures. Through jealousy women were tormented, like Dirce or the daughters of Danaus, suffering terrible and unholy acts of violence. But they courageously finished the course of faith and despite their bodily weakness won a noble prize.”

— Pope Clement I, third successor of St. Peter


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Gn 22:1b-19

God put Abraham to the test. He called to him, “Abraham!” “Here I am,” he replied. Then God said: “Take your son Isaac, your only one, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah. There you shall offer him up as a burnt offering on a height that I will point out to you.” Early the next morning Abraham saddled his donkey, took with him his son Isaac, and two of his servants as well, and with the wood that he had cut for the burnt offering, set out for the place of which God had told him.

On the third day Abraham got sight of the place from afar. Then he said to his servants: “Both of you stay here with the donkey, while the boy and I go on over yonder. We will worship and then come back to you.” Thereupon Abraham took the wood for the burnt offering and laid it on his son Isaac’s shoulders, while he himself carried the fire and the knife. As the two walked on together, Isaac spoke to his father Abraham: “Father!” he said. “Yes, son,” he replied. Isaac continued, “Here are the fire and the wood, but where is the sheep for the burnt offering?” “Son,” Abraham answered, “God himself will provide the sheep for the burnt offering.” Then the two continued going forward.

When they came to the place of which God had told him, Abraham built an altar there and arranged the wood on it. Next he tied up his son Isaac, and put him on top of the wood on the altar. Then he reached out and took the knife to slaughter his son. But the LORD’s messenger called to him from heaven, “Abraham, Abraham!” “Here I am,” he answered. “Do not lay your hand on the boy,” said the messenger. “Do not do the least thing to him. I know now how devoted you are to God, since you did not withhold from me your own beloved son.” As Abraham looked about, he spied a ram caught by its horns in the thicket. So he went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering in place of his son. Abraham named the site Yahweh-yireh; hence people now say, “On the mountain the LORD will see.” Again the LORD’s messenger called to Abraham from heaven and said: “I swear by myself, declares the LORD, that because you acted as you did in not withholding from me your beloved son, I will bless you abundantly and make your descendants as countless as the stars of the sky and the sands of the seashore; your descendants shall take possession of the gates of their enemies, and in your descendants all the nations of the earth shall find blessingBall this because you obeyed my command.”

Abraham then returned to his servants, and they set out together for Beer-sheba, where Abraham made his home.

Responsorial Psalm115:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9

R. (9) I will walk in the presence of the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Not to us, O LORD, not to us
but to your name give glory
because of your kindness, because of your truth.
Why should the pagans say,
“Where is their God?”

R. I will walk in the presence of the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Our God is in heaven;
whatever he wills, he does.
Their idols are silver and gold,
the handiwork of men.

R. I will walk in the presence of the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.

 They have mouths but speak not;
they have eyes but see not;
They have ears but hear not;
they have noses but smell not.

R. I will walk in the presence of the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Their makers shall be like them,
everyone who trusts in them.
The house of Israel trusts in the LORD;
he is their help and their shield.

R. I will walk in the presence of the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel ReadingMt 9:1-8

After entering a boat, Jesus made the crossing, and came into his own town. And there people brought to him a paralytic lying on a stretcher. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Courage, child, your sins are forgiven.” At that, some of the scribes said to themselves, “This man is blaspheming.” Jesus knew what they were thinking, and said, ”Why do you harbor evil thoughts? Which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise and walk’? But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”– he then said to the paralytic, “Rise, pick up your stretcher, and go home.” He rose and went home. When the crowds saw this they were struck with awe and glorified God who had given such authority to men.


First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

There were Christians in Rome within a dozen or so years after the death of Jesus, though they were not the converts of the “Apostle of the Gentiles” (see Romans 15:20). Paul had not yet visited them at the time he wrote his great letter in A.D. 57-58.

There was a large Jewish population in Rome. Probably as a result of controversy between Jews and Jewish Christians, the Emperor Claudius expelled all Jews from Rome in A.D. 49-50. Suetonius the historian says that the expulsion was due to disturbances in the city “caused by the certain Chrestus” [Christ]. Perhaps many came back after Claudius’s death in A.D. 54. Paul’s letter was addressed to a church with members from Jewish and gentile backgrounds.

In July of A.D. 64, more than half of Rome was destroyed by fire. Rumor blamed the tragedy on Nero, who wanted to enlarge his palace. He shifted the blame by accusing the Christians. According to the historian Tacitus, a “great multitude” of Christians were put to death because of their “hatred of the human race.” Peter and Paul were probably among the victims.

Threatened by an army revolt and condemned to death by the senate, Nero committed suicide in A.D. 68 at the age of thirty-one.

Wherever the Good News of Jesus was preached, it met the same opposition as Jesus did, and many of those who began to follow him shared his suffering and death. But no human force could stop the power of the Spirit unleashed upon the world. The blood of martyrs has always been, and will always be, the seed of Christians.

Excerpted from Saint of the Day, Leonard Foley, O.F.M.

Symbols: Red is the color for marytrs; red rose symbol of martyrdom; crown, symbolizing victory over death and sin; white horse with a white banner and cross and sword; fire or flames; palm, symbol of victory.

Things to Do:

  • St. Augustine gives us thoughts on why we celebrate the martyrs:

    Christians celebrate the memory of the martyrs with religious ceremony in order to arouse emulation and in order that they may be associated with their merits and helped by their prayers. But to none of the martyrs do we erect altars as we do to the God of martyrs; we erect altars at their shrines. For what bishop standing at the altars over the bodies of martyrs ever said: We offer to Peter or Paul or Cyprian? Mass is offered to God who crowned the martyrs, at the shrine of the martyrs, so that the very spot may remind us to arouse in ourselves a more fervent charity toward those whom we imitate and toward Him who gives us the power to do so.

  • Bake a special dessert, either some recipe originating from Rome, or the highlighted nameday cakes.
  • This feast was created with the reform of the General Calendar in 1969. Many Roman martyrs feasts were removed from the General Calendar, since there wasn’t too much historical information about them. This feast celebrates the nameless men and women who were martyred in Nero’s Circus in the year 64 AD.

via Catholic Culture | Liturgical Calendar

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The Credo: Profession of the Christian Faith

Icon depicting the First Council of Nicaea.
Wikipedia

THE CREDO

The Apostles Creed

I believe in God,
the Father almighty,
creator of heaven and earth.

I believe in Jesus Christ,
his only Son, our Lord.

He was conceived by the
power of the Holy Spirit
and born of the Virgin Mary.

He suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died, and was buried.
He descended into hell.

On the third day he rose again.

He ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again to judge
the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic Church,
the communion of saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and the life everlasting.

Amen.

The Nicene Creed

We believe in one God,
the Father, the Almighty,
Maker of all that is, seen and unseen. 

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father,
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made,
of one Being with the Father.

Through him all things were made. 

For us and for our salvation
he came down from heaven:
by the power of the Holy Spirit
he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary,
and was made man.

For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate;
he suffered death and was buried. 

On the third day he rose again
in accordance with the Scriptures;
he ascended into heaven
and is seated at the will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead,
and his kingdom will have no end. 

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son. 

With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified. 

He has spoken through the Prophets. 

We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church

We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins. 

We look for the resurrection of the dead,
and the  of the world to come.

Amen.

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Faith Aloud, a St. Louis-based religious group that advocates for abortion rights, began an online petition drive calling on Akin to apologize. The Rev. Krista Taves of Emerson Unitarian Universalist Chapel in Ellisville said Akin’s comment “shows how very little he knows about liberals, and how very little he knows about God.” “I’m a liberal because I love God and all God’s creation,” Taves said. “ I value equality, fairness and compassionate justice because my faith informs my politics.”

Faith Aloud, a St. Louis-based religious group that advocates for abortion rights, began an online petition drive calling on Akin to apologize.

The Rev. Krista Taves of Emerson Unitarian Universalist Chapel in Ellisville said Akin’s comment “shows how very little he knows about liberals, and how very little he knows about God.”

“I’m a liberal because I love God and all God’s creation,” Taves said. “ I value equality, fairness and compassionate justice because my faith informs my politics.”

Akin comments draw criticism from religious leaders

I love the quote above. It shows just how much certain “religious groups” know God so well that they support killing inutero but defend life after birth like there is some difference.

However, when you think about it. These people may very well know God better than all of us – especially the Church (you know Rome…). That is because their “God” is a deity of their own invention – their ego – themselves.

That said my God is creator of heaven and earth and “was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be.”

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Memorial of Saint Irenaeus, bishop and martyr

Irenaeus compiled a list of apostolic successi...

For this is why the Word became man, and the Son of God became the Son of man: so that man, by entering into communion with the Word and thus receiving divine sonship, might become a son of God.

– St. Irenaeus of Lyons

Today the universal Church celebrates the memorial of St. Irenaeus of Lyons who is a Church Father and apologist. Irenaues was a disciple of St. Polycarp who was, in turn, reported to be a disciple of John the Evangelist.

Irenaeus was an ardent defender of the Faith writing such master apologetics works such as Against Heresies (c. 180), which is a defense against Gnsotism especially that of Valintinus.

This saint and Father was also a defender of the doctrines of Apostolic Succession and Primacy of Rome. He was the first to put a successive list of Popes linking the Bishop of Rome, at that time, to St. Peter.


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Gn 19:15-29

As dawn was breaking, the angels urged Lot on, saying, “On your way! Take with you your wife and your two daughters who are here, or you will be swept away in the punishment of Sodom.” When he hesitated, the men, by the LORD’s mercy, seized his hand and the hands of his wife and his two daughters and led them to safety outside the city. As soon as they had been brought outside, he was told: “Flee for your life! Don’t look back or stop anywhere on the Plain. Get off to the hills at once, or you will be swept away.” “Oh, no, my lord!” Lot replied, “You have already thought enough of your servant to do me the great kindness of intervening to save my life. But I cannot flee to the hills to keep the disaster from overtaking me, and so I shall die. Look, this town ahead is near enough to escape to. It’s only a small place. Let me flee there–it’s a small place, is it not?– that my life may be saved.” “Well, then,” he replied, “I will also grant you the favor you now ask. I will not overthrow the town you speak of.  Hurry, escape there! I cannot do anything until you arrive there.” That is why the town is called Zoar.

The sun was just rising over the earth as Lot arrived in Zoar; at the same time the LORD rained down sulphurous fire upon Sodom and Gomorrah from the LORD out of heaven. He overthrew those cities and the whole Plain, together with the inhabitants of the cities and the produce of the soil. But Lot’s wife looked back, and she was turned into a pillar of salt.

Early the next morning Abraham went to the place where he had stood in the LORD’s presence. As he looked down toward Sodom and Gomorrah and the whole region of the Plain, he saw dense smoke over the land rising like fumes from a furnace.

Thus it came to pass: when God destroyed the Cities of the Plain, he was mindful of Abraham by sending Lot away from the upheaval by which God overthrew the cities where Lot had been living.

Responsorial Psalm26:2-3, 9-10, 11-12
R. (3a) O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

Search me, O LORD, and try me;
test my soul and my heart.
For your mercy is before my eyes,
and I walk in your truth.

R. O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

Gather not my soul with those of sinners,
nor with men of blood my life.
On their hands are crimes,
and their right hands are full of bribes.

R. O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

But I walk in integrity;
redeem me, and have mercy on me.
My foot stands on level ground;
in the assemblies I will bless the LORD.

R. O Lord, your mercy is before my eyes.

Gospel Reading: Mt 8:23-27

As Jesus got into a boat, his disciples followed him. Suddenly a violent storm came up on the sea, so that the boat was being swamped by waves; but he was asleep. They came and woke him, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” He said to them, “Why are you terrified, O you of little faith?” Then he got up, rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was great calm. The men were amazed and said, “What sort of man is this, whom even the winds and the sea obey?”


About St. Irenaeus of Lyons

After Irenaeus had spent a number of years in combat against the eastern gnostics and philosophers of error, Saint Polycarp determined to send him to Gaul, where many of the heretics of Asia Minor had already migrated to pursue the Catholic religion, which was beginning to find roots there. With a company of about forty Christians, the valiant soldier of Christ ascended the Rhone to Lyons to rejoin and aid Saint Pothinus, its bishop. Saint Pothinus was already advanced in age, and his church’s neophytes could not always distinguish truth from the gnostic aberrations. Saint Pothinus received the apostles with joy and soon ordained Saint Irenaeus. 

A hundred times he exposed himself to martyrdom by his zeal, acting as the right arm of the aging bishop, but God was reserving that crown for him twenty-five years later. When Saint Pothinus had glorified God by his splendid martyr’s death in the year 177, Ireneus was chosen to be the second bishop of Lyons. The persecutors imagined that Christianity had been stifled in Lyons, and they ceased their pursuits for a time.

This great Doctor of the Church wrote many important works, of which the most famous is his Adversus Haereses, Against the Heresies, in explanation of the Faith. By his preaching, Saint Irenaeus in a short time converted almost the whole country to the Faith; the Christians of Lyons became models by their candor, their estrangement from all ambition, their poverty, chastity and temperance, and in this way confounded many adversaries of their religion. Saint Irenaeus continued to imitate what he had seen done by his beloved master, Saint Polycarp, himself the disciple and imitator of Saint John the Apostle. One can readily imagine the excellence of the administration and the breadth of charity reigning in the Church of Lyons.

Finally he suffered martyrdom there, with many others, in the year 202, under the Emperor Septimus Severus, after eighty years spent in the service of the Lord. The imperial decrees renewing the persecutions arrived at Lyons at the time of the celebration of Severus’ tenth year of reign; the pagans found amid the celebrations an opportunity to take vengeance on the Christians, who refused to participate in the debaucheries which accompanied these feastings. Assassins armed with daggers, stones and knives filled the city with blood, and thousands of Christians won, with their bishop, the crown they had always admired as the greatest glory God could grant His servants.

Excerpted from Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, a compilation based on Butler’s Lives of the Saints, and other sources by John Gilmary Shea (Benziger Brothers: New York, 1894); Les Petits Bollandistes: Vies des Saints, by Msgr. Paul Guérin (Bloud et Barral: Paris, 1882), Vol. 7.

Patron: Archdiocese of Mobile, Alabama.

Symbols: Lighted torch; book.

Things to Do:

  • St. Irenaeus of Lyons wrote extensively. You can read some of his writings, his most famous writing being Against the Heresies.
  • St. Irenaeus was a great defender of the Faith. Spend some time today learning more about the teachings of the Church. Dave Armstrong is an excellent apologist and you could start with his Church Fathers page.

via Catholic Culture | Liturgical Year

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