Tag Archives: Gospel

Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter

First Reading: Acts 25:13b-21

King Agrippa and Bernice arrived in Caesarea on a visit to Festus. Since they spent several days there, Festus referred Paul’s case to the king, saying, “There is a man here left in custody by Felix. When I was in Jerusalem the chief priests and the elders of the Jews brought charges against him and demanded his condemnation. I answered them that it was not Roman practice to hand over an accused person before he has faced his accusers and had the opportunity to defend himself against their charge. So when they came together here, I made no delay; he next day I took my seat on the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought in. His accusers stood around him, but did not charge him with any of the crimes I suspected. Instead they had some issues with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus who had died but who Paul claimed was alive. Since I was at a loss how to investigate this controversy, I asked if he were willing to go to Jerusalem and there stand trial on these charges. And when Paul appealed that he be held in custody for the Emperor’s decision, I ordered him held until I could send him to Caesar.”


Responsorial Psalm: 103:1-2, 11-12, 19-20ab

R. (19a) The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Bless the LORD, O my soul;
and all my being, bless his holy name.
Bless the LORD, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

For as the heavens are high above the earth,
so surpassing is his kindness toward those who fear him.
As far as the east is from the west,
so far has he put our transgressions from us.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

The LORD has established his throne in heaven,
and his kingdom rules over all.
Bless the LORD, all you his angels,
you mighty in strength, who do his bidding.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.


Gospel: Jn 21:15-19

After Jesus had revealed himself to his disciples and eaten breakfast with them, he said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” He then said to Simon Peter a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”


Personal Reflection on the Gospel
Today’s Gospel reading is, as every Gospel, significant. In one sense we can see the love God has for us in His mercy and desire to save us. Peter, remaining in the lead role given to him in Matthew 16:18, is given a three-fold opportunity to, which he takes advantage of, receive forgiveness for denying Christ thrice.

In another sense, this passage gives more evidence for the role of the papacy or Chief of the Apostles. Christ speaking only to Peter, reaffirms the mandate and role of his office (cf Isaiah 22:22):

  • Feed my lambs
  • Tend my sheep
  • Feed my sheep

Christ rounds out this passage with a clear and sobering statement of what will happen, not only personally to Peter but potentially to all who bear witness to Him and His glory.

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Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter

First Reading: Acts 25:13b-21
King Agrippa and Bernice arrived in Caesarea on a visit to Festus. Since they spent several days there, Festus referred Paul’s case to the king, saying, “There is a man here left in custody by Felix. When I was in Jerusalem the chief priests and the elders of the Jews brought charges against him and demanded his condemnation. I answered them that it was not Roman practice to hand over an accused person before he has faced his accusers and had the opportunity to defend himself against their charge. So when they came together here, I made no delay; he next day I took my seat on the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought in. His accusers stood around him, but did not charge him with any of the crimes I suspected. Instead they had some issues with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus who had died but who Paul claimed was alive. Since I was at a loss how to investigate this controversy, I asked if he were willing to go to Jerusalem and there stand trial on these charges. And when Paul appealed that he be held in custody for the Emperor’s decision, I ordered him held until I could send him to Caesar.”


Responsorial Psalm: 103:1-2, 11-12, 19-20ab

R. (19a) The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Bless the LORD, O my soul;
and all my being, bless his holy name.
Bless the LORD, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

For as the heavens are high above the earth,
so surpassing is his kindness toward those who fear him.
As far as the east is from the west,
so far has he put our transgressions from us.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

The LORD has established his throne in heaven,
and his kingdom rules over all.
Bless the LORD, all you his angels,
you mighty in strength, who do his bidding.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.


Gospel: Jn 21:15-19

After Jesus had revealed himself to his disciples and eaten breakfast with them, he said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” He then said to Simon Peter a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”


Personal Reflection on the Gospel
Today’s Gospel reading is, as every Gospel, significant. In one sense we can see the love God has for us in His mercy and desire to save us. Peter, remaining in the lead role given to him in Matthew 16:18, is given a three-fold opportunity to, which he takes advantage of, receive forgiveness for denying Christ thrice.
In another sense, this passage gives more evidence for the role of the papacy or Chief of the Apostles. Christ speaking only to Peter, reaffirms the mandate and role of his office (cf Isaiah 22:22):

  • Feed my lambs
  • Tend my sheep
  • Feed my sheep

Christ rounds out this passage with a clear and sobering statement of what will happen, not only personally to Peter but potentially to all who bear witness to Him and His glory.

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Free Catholic Bible Study

“The following may be helpful for seminary students, religious professor/faculty- teachers, any Catholic students taking  religious education classes,  and also may be of use in helping priests prepare sermons for Gospels readings of the day using Catholic commentaries, and church Fathers quotes, religious Education Directors and CCD Teachers, and of course it may be useful for any Catholic in learning more about their faith, Scripture etc…..”

A great Catholic Bible and Catechetical Downloadable Resource & Study Software Program, and best of all its Free.    From:  http://www.esnips.com/web/CatholicApolegetics

via Defenders of the Catholic Faith : Hosted by Stephen K. Ray » Free Catholic Bible Study.

Free Catholic Bible Study

“The following may be helpful for seminary students, religious professor/faculty- teachers, any Catholic students taking  religious education classes,  and also may be of use in helping priests prepare sermons for Gospels readings of the day using Catholic commentaries, and church Fathers quotes, religious Education Directors and CCD Teachers, and of course it may be useful for any Catholic in learning more about their faith, Scripture etc…..”

A great Catholic Bible and Catechetical Downloadable Resource & Study Software Program, and best of all its Free.    From:  http://www.esnips.com/web/CatholicApolegetics

via Defenders of the Catholic Faith : Hosted by Stephen K. Ray » Free Catholic Bible Study.

Feast of Saint Andrew, Apostle

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Icon of Saint Andrew. Image via Saint Andrew Ukranian Catholic Church, Parma Ohio.

We have found the Messiah!

– St. Andrew

On this day my parish, and many others around the world, celebrate the feast of their patron Saint Andrew the Apostle.

St. Andrew was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee, a fisherman by trade, and a former disciple of John the Baptist. He was the one who introduced his brother Peter to Jesus, saying, “We have found the Messiah.” Overshadowed henceforth by his brother, Andrew nevertheless appears again in the Gospels as introducing souls to Christ. After Pentecost, Andrew took up the apostolate on a wider scale, and is said to have been martyred at Patras in southern Greece on a cross which was in the form of an “X”. This type of cross has long been known as “St. Andrew’s cross.”

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year.


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Romans 10:9-18 (DRB w/ Haydock Commentary)

Brothers and sisters:

…If you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. 10 For man believes with his heart and so is justified, and he confesses with his lips and so is saved. The scripture says,

“No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and bestows his riches upon all who call upon him. For,

“every one who calls upon the name of the Lord will be saved.”

But how are men to call upon him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without a preacher? And how can men preach unless they are sent? As it is written,

“How beautiful are the feet of those who preach good news!”

But they have not all obeyed the gospel; for Isaiah says,

“Lord, who has believed what he has heard from us?”

So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes by the preaching of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have; for

“Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.” (RSV)

Responsorial: Psalm 19[18]:8-11 (DRB w/ Haydock Commentary)

R. (10) The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just. (NAB)
or:
R. (John 6:63) Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

The law of the LORD is perfect,
reviving the soul;
The testimony of the LORD is sure,
making wise the simple; (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

The precepts of the LORD are right,
rejoicing the heart;
The commandment of the LORD is pure,
enlightening the eyes. (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

The fear of the LORD is clean,
enduring forever;
The ordinances of the LORD are true,
and righteous altogether. (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

More to be desired are they than gold,
even much fine gold;
Sweeter also than honey
and drippings of the honeycomb. (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

Gospel: Matthew 4:18-22 (DRB w/ Haydock Commentary & Catena Aurea)

As [Jesus] walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. And he said to them,

“Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him.

And going on from there he saw two other brothers, James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him. (RSV)


St. Andrew (or Andreas) the Apostle
Andrew, Peter’s brother, and John were the first disciples to follow the Lord. With tender delicacy the Gospel (John 1:35-42) describes their first meeting with Jesus. Andrew did not belong to the inner circle of the apostles, Peter, James and John, and the evangelists narrate nothing extraordinary about him (John 6:8); but tradition (resting on apocryphal Acts) extols his great love of the Cross and of the Savior; and the Church distinguishes him both in the Mass (his name occurs in the Canon and in the Libera since the time of Pope St. Gregory I who had a special devotion to him) and in the Breviary.

The story of his martyrdom rests on the apocryphal Acts which lack historical foundation. The pagan judge exhorted him to sacrifice to the gods. Andrew replied: “I sacrifice daily to almighty God, the one and true God. Not the flesh of oxen and the blood of goats do I offer, but the unspotted Lamb upon the altar. All the faithful partake of His flesh, yet the Lamb remains unharmed and living.” Angered by the reply, Aegeas commanded him to be thrown into prison. With little difficulty the people would have freed him, but Andrew personally calmed the mob and earnestly entreated them to desist, as he was hastening toward an ardently desired crown of martyrdom.

When Andrew was led to the place of martyrdom, on beholding the cross from a distance he cried out: “O good Cross, so long desired and now set up for my longing soul I confident and rejoicing come to you; exultingly receive me, a disciple of Him who hung on you.” Forthwith he was nailed to the cross. For two days he hung there alive, unceasingly proclaiming the doctrine of Christ until he passed on to Him whose likeness in death he had so vehemently desired. –The legendary account of our saint’s martyrdom has this value: it presents to us the mysticism of the Cross of later times.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch.

Patron: Achaia; Amalfi, Italy; anglers; Burgundy; diocese of Constantinople; fish dealers; fish mongers; fishermen; gout; Greece; Lampertheim; Germany; maidens; old maids; Patras, Greece; Russia; Scotland; singers; sore throats; spinsters; University of Patras; unmarried women; women who wish to become mothers.

Symbols: Fish; Saint Andrew’s cross; Cross saltire (x-shaped); V or Y-shaped cross; two fishes; tall cross and book; vertical spear; primitive fish-hook; fisherman’s net.
Often Portrayed As: Man bound to a cross; man preaching from a cross; preacher holding some fish.

Things to Do:

  • Today’s feast traditionally marks the end of the Church year and beginning of Advent. Advent always begins on the Sunday closest to November 30, with this day being the last possible day of the old Liturgical Year. Christmas is right around the corner. An old saying reflected this:

St Andrew the King
Three weeks and three days
before Christmas begins.

Because weddings were not allowed during Advent and Christmas and Andrew is the patron of unmarried maidens, many countries have marriage-related superstitions connected to this day. See Patron Saints Index for a few traditions.

  • Beginning today the Christmas Anticipatory Prayer, also known as the “Novena to St. Andrew” (Hail and Blessed be the hour…) is prayed every day until Christmas.
  • View some of the art depictions of St. Andrew. Here’s another Gallery of Images of Andrew.
  • Remember to pray for fishermen and all who make their livelihood by the sea.
  • Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, Russia, and Romania. The flag of Scotland (and the Union Flag and the arms and Flag of Nova Scotia) feature a saltire (X-shaped cross) in commemoration of the shape of St. Andrew’s cross.
  • Read more about St. Andrew from Butler’s Lives of the Saints. Also read about Andrew from The Golden Legend.
  • Foods connected with this feast: St. Andrew was a fishermen, so fish dishes and biblical themes would reign supreme. Women for Faith and Family have reprinted Evelyn Vitz’s suggested “Biblical Dinner” menu. But there are other foods connected with this day:

  • Scotland: St. Andrew is the patron of Scotland. Scones, haggis, sheepshead and fish dishes are traditional. The scones are called “wigs”, although their shape is rectangular.
  • England: St Andrew is a patron of lace-makers. On his feast, sometimes known as “Tander”, areas such as Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Northamptonshire celebrate by feasting, drinking elderberry wine, sports and serving a special cake called the Tandra Cake, particularly in Bedfordshire. It has a bread dough base to which lard, sugar, currants, lemon peel and eggs are added. This is also a day for squirrel hunting in England, so Brunswick Stew would be another dish on the table in England.
  • Slovakian Countries: Halushky (pasta dish) is cooked. Unmarried girls place slips of paper with names of single young men into the dish.

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year.


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Saint Andrew the Apostle Catholic School Banner. Image via Saint Andrew the Apostle Catholic School, Clifton, VA.

About my parish
Our church is in Clifton, Virginia and first opened it’s doors in 1992. We are a thriving and growing community.

If you are interested in becoming a parish member, registration forms are available on the link to the left, in the pamphlet racks at all the entrances, or you may stop by the parish office during the week.

Please notify the office when your telephone number changes, and when you are moving within or outside the parish.

Our parish boundaries are as follows:

Begin at Rt. 29 at the Fairfax County and Prince William County line and proceed south along the county line (Bull Run) to Popes Head Creek.   From Popes Head Creek proceed north to Compton Road (including Balmoral of Clifton subdivision) east of the Balmoral of Clifton subdivision.   Proceed east on Compton Road to Clifton Road.   Proceed north on Clifton Road to Braddock Road.   Continue east on Braddock Road to Piney Branch Creek.   Follow Piney Branch Creek to intersection of Rt. 29 and Legato Road.   Proceed west on Rt. 29 to the Fairfax County and Prince William County line.

Our parish school has a maximum capacity of 290 students. Please use the link for St Andrew the Apostle Catholic School to learn how to enroll your children in our wonderful parish school. Additionally, we offer religious education to over 740 students from the public school system. You may use the link for information on enrolling in the Religious Education program.

Check out the Groups and Schedules page to see some of the 32 clubs and activities that are active this year.

via St Andrew the Apostle Catholic Church Clifton, Virginia.

Feast of Saint Andrew, Apostle

standrewiconphoto

We have found the Messiah!

– St. Andrew

On this day my parish, and many others around the world, celebrate the feast of their patron Saint Andrew the Apostle.

St. Andrew was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee, a fisherman by trade, and a former disciple of John the Baptist. He was the one who introduced his brother Peter to Jesus, saying, “We have found the Messiah.” Overshadowed henceforth by his brother, Andrew nevertheless appears again in the Gospels as introducing souls to Christ. After Pentecost, Andrew took up the apostolate on a wider scale, and is said to have been martyred at Patras in southern Greece on a cross which was in the form of an “X”. This type of cross has long been known as “St. Andrew’s cross.”

via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year.


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Romans 10:9-18 (DRB w/ Haydock Commentary)

Brothers and sisters:

…If you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. 10 For man believes with his heart and so is justified, and he confesses with his lips and so is saved. The scripture says,

“No one who believes in him will be put to shame.”

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and bestows his riches upon all who call upon him. For,

“every one who calls upon the name of the Lord will be saved.”

But how are men to call upon him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without a preacher? And how can men preach unless they are sent? As it is written,

“How beautiful are the feet of those who preach good news!”

But they have not all obeyed the gospel; for Isaiah says,

“Lord, who has believed what he has heard from us?”

So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes by the preaching of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have; for

“Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.” (RSV)

Responsorial: Psalm 19[18]:8-11 (DRB w/ Haydock Commentary)

R. (10) The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just. (NAB)
or:
R. (John 6:63) Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

The law of the LORD is perfect,
reviving the soul;
The testimony of the LORD is sure,
making wise the simple; (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

The precepts of the LORD are right,
rejoicing the heart;
The commandment of the LORD is pure,
enlightening the eyes. (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

The fear of the LORD is clean,
enduring forever;
The ordinances of the LORD are true,
and righteous altogether. (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

More to be desired are they than gold,
even much fine gold;
Sweeter also than honey
and drippings of the honeycomb. (RSV)

R. The judgments of the Lord are true, and all of them are just.
or:
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

Gospel: Matthew 4:18-22 (DRB w/ Haydock Commentary & Catena Aurea)

As [Jesus] walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen. And he said to them,

“Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him.

And going on from there he saw two other brothers, James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him. (RSV)


St. Andrew (or Andreas) the Apostle
Andrew, Peter’s brother, and John were the first disciples to follow the Lord. With tender delicacy the Gospel (John 1:35-42) describes their first meeting with Jesus. Andrew did not belong to the inner circle of the apostles, Peter, James and John, and the evangelists narrate nothing extraordinary about him (John 6:8); but tradition (resting on apocryphal Acts) extols his great love of the Cross and of the Savior; and the Church distinguishes him both in the Mass (his name occurs in the Canon and in the Libera since the time of Pope St. Gregory I who had a special devotion to him) and in the Breviary.

The story of his martyrdom rests on the apocryphal Acts which lack historical foundation. The pagan judge exhorted him to sacrifice to the gods. Andrew replied: “I sacrifice daily to almighty God, the one and true God. Not the flesh of oxen and the blood of goats do I offer, but the unspotted Lamb upon the altar. All the faithful partake of His flesh, yet the Lamb remains unharmed and living.” Angered by the reply, Aegeas commanded him to be thrown into prison. With little difficulty the people would have freed him, but Andrew personally calmed the mob and earnestly entreated them to desist, as he was hastenin
g toward an ardently desired crown of martyrdom.

When Andrew was led to the place of martyrdom, on beholding the cross from a distance he cried out: “O good Cross, so long desired and now set up for my longing soul I confident and rejoicing come to you; exultingly receive me, a disciple of Him who hung on you.” Forthwith he was nailed to the cross. For two days he hung there alive, unceasingly proclaiming the doctrine of Christ until he passed on to Him whose likeness in death he had so vehemently desired. —The legendary account of our saint’s martyrdom has this value: it presents to us the mysticism of the Cross of later times.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch.

Patron: Achaia; Amalfi, Italy; anglers; Burgundy; diocese of Constantinople; fish dealers; fish mongers; fishermen; gout; Greece; Lampertheim; Germany; maidens; old maids; Patras, Greece; Russia; Scotland; singers; sore throats; spinsters; University of Patras; unmarried women; women who wish to become mothers.

Symbols: Fish; Saint Andrew’s cross; Cross saltire (x-shaped); V or Y-shaped cross; two fishes; tall cross and book; vertical spear; primitive fish-hook; fisherman’s net.
Often Portrayed As: Man bound to a cross; man preaching from a cross; preacher holding some fish.

Things to Do:

  • Today’s feast traditionally marks the end of the Church year and beginning of Advent. Advent always begins on the Sunday closest to November 30, with this day being the last possible day of the old Liturgical Year. Christmas is right around the corner. An old saying reflected this:

St Andrew the King
Three weeks and three days
before Christmas begins.

Because weddings were not allowed during Advent and Christmas and Andrew is the patron of unmarried maidens, many countries have marriage-related superstitions connected to this day. See Patron Saints Index for a few traditions.

  • Beginning today the Christmas Anticipatory Prayer, also known as the “Novena to St. Andrew” (Hail and Blessed be the hour…) is prayed every day until Christmas.
  • View some of the art depictions of St. Andrew. Here’s another Gallery of Images of Andrew.
  • Remember to pray for fishermen and all who make their livelihood by the sea.
  • Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, Russia, and Romania. The flag of Scotland (and the Union Flag and the arms and Flag of Nova Scotia) feature a saltire (X-shaped cross) in commemoration of the shape of St. Andrew’s cross.
  • Read more about St. Andrew from Butler’s Lives of the Saints. Also read about Andrew from The Golden Legend.
  • Foods connected with this feast: St. Andrew was a fishermen, so fish dishes and biblical themes would reign supreme. Women for Faith and Family have reprinted Evelyn Vitz’s suggested “Biblical Dinner” menu. But there are other foods connected with this day:

    • Scotland: St. Andrew is the patron of Scotland. Scones, haggis, sheepshead and fish dishes are traditional. The scones are called “wigs”, although their shape is rectangular.
    • England: St Andrew is a patron of lace-makers. On his feast, sometimes known as “Tander”, areas such as Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Northamptonshire celebrate by feasting, drinking elderberry wine, sports and serving a special cake called the Tandra Cake, particularly in Bedfordshire. It has a bread dough base to which lard, sugar, currants, lemon peel and eggs are added. This is also a day for squirrel hunting in England, so Brunswick Stew would be another dish on the table in England.
    • Slovakian Countries: Halushky (pasta dish) is cooked. Unmarried girls place slips of paper with names of single young men into the dish.

    via Catholic Culture : Liturgical Year.


st andrew school banner2

About my parish
Our church is in Clifton, Virginia and first opened it’s doors in 1992. We are a thriving and growing community.

If you are interested in becoming a parish member, registration forms are available on the link to the left, in the pamphlet racks at all the entrances, or you may stop by the parish office during the week.

Please notify the office when your telephone number changes, and when you are moving within or outside the parish.

Our parish boundaries are as follows:

Begin at Rt. 29 at the Fairfax County and Prince William County line and proceed south along the county line (Bull Run) to Popes Head Creek.   From Popes Head Creek proceed north to Compton Road (including Balmoral of Clifton subdivision) east of the Balmoral of Clifton subdivision.   Proceed east on Compton Road to Clifton Road.   Proceed north on Clifton Road to Braddock Road.   Continue east on Braddock Road to Piney Branch Creek.   Follow Piney Branch Creek to intersection of Rt. 29 and Legato Road.   Proceed west on Rt. 29 to the Fairfax County and Prince William County line.

Our parish school has a maximum capacity of 290 students. Please use the link for St Andrew the Apostle Catholic School to learn how to enroll your children in our wonderful parish school. Additionally, we offer religious education to over 740 students from the public school system. You may use the link for information on enrolling in the Religious Education program.

Check out the Groups and Schedules page to see some of the 32 clubs and activities that are active this year.

via St Andrew the Apostle Catholic Church Clifton, Virginia.

The Parable of the Fig Tree

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In today’s Liturgy of the Word we are presented with the following Gospel reading from the Gospel According to Saint Luke:

And he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree, and all the trees; as soon as they come out in leaf, you see for yourselves and know that the summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away till all has taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.” (Luke (RSV) 21:29-33)

As we near the end of the Liturgical Year, the readings at Mass always begin to remind us of the Eschaton or End Times. The intent of these readings seems consistent with the Church’s overall mission of feeding and caring for Jesus’ flock until His return. In this she must ensure that all hear the message of the Gospel, striving that all come to know the Love and Mercy of Our Risen Savior.

The Parable of Fig Tree is no different of course. In this, we find Jesus teaching His disciples through the image of a fig tree and its leaves. Our Lord equates the blossoming of a fig tree to the blossoming or fulfillment of the End. The leaves of the fig tree serve as a barometer for the coming of summer just as the signs detailed in many of the apocalyptic writing do the same for the end of the world.

Moreover, in my unscholarly opinion, the reference to summer is not in error or even related to the season in which this parable was probably told, it is a play on the memories that summer often evokes: joy and celebration. For the Faithful the End Times is not a moment of despair or worry despite the necessary pain and suffering that we must endure prior to, it is a time for joyous celebration as Our Blessed Lord would be returning triumphantly to gather His sheep to spend eternity with Him.

This parable also serves to remind us that we must remain vigilant for the signs of the end. This does not mean that we seek to know the end for our own disordered purposes such a vain preparation of our lives at the last-minute but instead it is a reminder that vigilance requires us to maintain our faith and works consistent with the fact that the end will occur without warning.