Tag Archives: Jerusalem

Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ

2007 Corpus Christi procession in Lowicz, Pola...

Now as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed, and broke it, and gave it to the disciples and said, “Take, eat; this is my body.” And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he gave it to them, saying, “Drink of it, all of you; for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.

— Matthew 26:26-28


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Dt 8:2-3, 14b-16a

Moses said to the people:

“Remember how for forty years now the LORD, your God, has directed all your journeying in the desert, so as to test you by affliction and find out whether or not it was your intention to keep his commandments. He therefore let you be afflicted with hunger, and then fed you with manna, a food unknown to you and your fathers, in order to show you that not by bread alone does one live, but by every word that comes forth from the mouth of the LORD.

“Do not forget the LORD, your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, that place of slavery; who guided you through the vast and terrible desert with its saraph serpents and scorpions, its parched and waterless ground; who brought forth water for you from the flinty rock and fed you in the desert with manna, a food unknown to your fathers.”

Responsorial Psalm147:12-13, 14-15, 19-20

R. (12) Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.

 Glorify the LORD, O Jerusalem;
praise your God, O Zion.
For he has strengthened the bars of your gates;
he has blessed your children within you.

R. Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has granted peace in your borders;
with the best of wheat he fills you.
He sends forth his command to the earth;
swiftly runs his word!

R. Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.

He has proclaimed his word to Jacob,
his statutes and his ordinances to Israel.
He has not done thus for any other nation;
his ordinances he has not made known to them. Alleluia.

R. Praise the Lord, Jerusalem.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Second Reading: 1 Cor 10:16-17

Brothers and sisters:

The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ? Because the loaf of bread is one, we, though many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf.

Gospel Reading: Jn 6:51-58

Jesus said to the Jewish crowds:

“I am the living bread that came down from heaven; whoever eats this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world.”

The Jews quarreled among themselves, saying, ”How can this man give us his flesh to eat?”

Jesus said to them,

“Amen, amen, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you do not have life within you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him on the last day. For my flesh is true food, and my blood is true drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me and I in him. Just as the living Father sent me and I have life because of the Father, so also the one who feeds on me will have life because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven. Unlike your ancestors who ate and still died, whoever eats this bread will live forever.”


Feast of Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi (Body and Blood of Christ) is a Eucharistic solemnity, or better, the solemn commemoration of the institution of that sacrament. It is, moreover, the Church’s official act of homage and gratitude to Christ, who by instituting the Holy Eucharist gave to the Church her greatest treasure. Holy Thursday, assuredly, marks the anniversary of the institution, but the commemoration of the Lord’s passion that very night suppresses the rejoicing proper to the occasion. Today’s observance, therefore, accents the joyous aspect of Holy Thursday.

The Mass and the Office for the feast was edited or composed by St. Thomas Aquinas upon the request of Pope Urban IV in the year 1264. It is unquestionably a classic piece of liturgical work, wholly in accord with the best liturgical traditions… It is a perfect work of art.

— Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch.

In the words of St. Thomas:

“How inestimable a dignity, beloved brethren, divine bounty has bestowed upon us Christians from the treasury of its infinite goodness! For there neither is nor ever has been a people to whom the gods were so nigh as our Lord and God is nigh unto us.

“Desirous that we be made partakers of His divinity, the only-begotten Son of God has taken to Himself our nature so that having become man, He would be enabled to make men gods. Whatever He assumed of our nature He wrought unto our salvation. For on the altar of the Cross He immolated to the Father His own Body as victim for our reconciliation and shed His blood both for our ransom and for our regeneration. Moreover, in order that a remembrance of so great benefits may always be with us, He has left us His Body as food and His Blood as drink under appearances of bread and wine.

“O banquet most precious! O banquet most admirable! O banquet overflowing with every spiritual delicacy! Can anything be more excellent than this repast, in which not the flesh of goats and heifers, as of old, but Christ the true God is given us for nourishment? What more wondrous than this holy sacrament! In it bread and wine are changed substantially, and under the appearance of a little bread and wine is had Christ Jesus, God and perfect Man. In this sacrament sins are purged away, virtues are increased, the soul is satiated with an abundance of every spiritual gift. No other sacrament is so beneficial. Since it was instituted unto the salvation of all, it is offered by Holy Church for the living and for the dead, that all may share in its treasures.

“My dearly beloved, is it not beyond human power to express the ineffable delicacy of this sacrament in which spiritual sweetness is tasted in its very source, in which is brought to mind the remembrance of that all-excelling charity which Christ showed in His sacred passion? Surely it was to impress more profoundly upon the hearts of the faithful the immensity of this charity that our loving Savior instituted this sacrament at the last supper when, having celebrated the Pasch with His disciples. He was about to leave the world and return to the Father. It was to serve as an unending remembrance of His passion, as the fulfillment of ancient types — this the greatest of His miracles. To those who sorrow over His departure He has given a unique solace.”

Symbols: The usual symbol for the Holy Eucharist is a chalice, with a host rising out of it.

The chalice is shown with a hexagonal base, as a rule, symbolizing the Six Attributes of the Deity (power, wisdom, majesty, mercy, justice and love), and with a richly wrought stem of gold, studded with precious stones. The host is shown as the typical circular wafer, upon which may be imprinted the letters I. N. R. I., from which proceed rays of light, symbolical of the Real Presence, the substantial presence of Christ under the species of bread and wine.

An altar, upon which is set a cross, two or more candles in their tall candlesticks, a chalice and a ciborium, is another symbol often seen.

Things to Do:

via Catholic Culture | Litugical Year

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Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter

First Reading: Acts 25:13b-21

King Agrippa and Bernice arrived in Caesarea on a visit to Festus. Since they spent several days there, Festus referred Paul’s case to the king, saying, “There is a man here left in custody by Felix. When I was in Jerusalem the chief priests and the elders of the Jews brought charges against him and demanded his condemnation. I answered them that it was not Roman practice to hand over an accused person before he has faced his accusers and had the opportunity to defend himself against their charge. So when they came together here, I made no delay; he next day I took my seat on the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought in. His accusers stood around him, but did not charge him with any of the crimes I suspected. Instead they had some issues with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus who had died but who Paul claimed was alive. Since I was at a loss how to investigate this controversy, I asked if he were willing to go to Jerusalem and there stand trial on these charges. And when Paul appealed that he be held in custody for the Emperor’s decision, I ordered him held until I could send him to Caesar.”


Responsorial Psalm: 103:1-2, 11-12, 19-20ab

R. (19a) The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Bless the LORD, O my soul;
and all my being, bless his holy name.
Bless the LORD, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

For as the heavens are high above the earth,
so surpassing is his kindness toward those who fear him.
As far as the east is from the west,
so far has he put our transgressions from us.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

The LORD has established his throne in heaven,
and his kingdom rules over all.
Bless the LORD, all you his angels,
you mighty in strength, who do his bidding.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.


Gospel: Jn 21:15-19

After Jesus had revealed himself to his disciples and eaten breakfast with them, he said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” He then said to Simon Peter a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”


Personal Reflection on the Gospel
Today’s Gospel reading is, as every Gospel, significant. In one sense we can see the love God has for us in His mercy and desire to save us. Peter, remaining in the lead role given to him in Matthew 16:18, is given a three-fold opportunity to, which he takes advantage of, receive forgiveness for denying Christ thrice.

In another sense, this passage gives more evidence for the role of the papacy or Chief of the Apostles. Christ speaking only to Peter, reaffirms the mandate and role of his office (cf Isaiah 22:22):

  • Feed my lambs
  • Tend my sheep
  • Feed my sheep

Christ rounds out this passage with a clear and sobering statement of what will happen, not only personally to Peter but potentially to all who bear witness to Him and His glory.

Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter

First Reading: Acts 25:13b-21
King Agrippa and Bernice arrived in Caesarea on a visit to Festus. Since they spent several days there, Festus referred Paul’s case to the king, saying, “There is a man here left in custody by Felix. When I was in Jerusalem the chief priests and the elders of the Jews brought charges against him and demanded his condemnation. I answered them that it was not Roman practice to hand over an accused person before he has faced his accusers and had the opportunity to defend himself against their charge. So when they came together here, I made no delay; he next day I took my seat on the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought in. His accusers stood around him, but did not charge him with any of the crimes I suspected. Instead they had some issues with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus who had died but who Paul claimed was alive. Since I was at a loss how to investigate this controversy, I asked if he were willing to go to Jerusalem and there stand trial on these charges. And when Paul appealed that he be held in custody for the Emperor’s decision, I ordered him held until I could send him to Caesar.”


Responsorial Psalm: 103:1-2, 11-12, 19-20ab

R. (19a) The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Bless the LORD, O my soul;
and all my being, bless his holy name.
Bless the LORD, O my soul,
and forget not all his benefits.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

For as the heavens are high above the earth,
so surpassing is his kindness toward those who fear him.
As far as the east is from the west,
so far has he put our transgressions from us.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.

The LORD has established his throne in heaven,
and his kingdom rules over all.
Bless the LORD, all you his angels,
you mighty in strength, who do his bidding.

R. The Lord has established his throne in heaven.
or:
R. Alleluia.


Gospel: Jn 21:15-19

After Jesus had revealed himself to his disciples and eaten breakfast with them, he said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” He then said to Simon Peter a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”


Personal Reflection on the Gospel
Today’s Gospel reading is, as every Gospel, significant. In one sense we can see the love God has for us in His mercy and desire to save us. Peter, remaining in the lead role given to him in Matthew 16:18, is given a three-fold opportunity to, which he takes advantage of, receive forgiveness for denying Christ thrice.
In another sense, this passage gives more evidence for the role of the papacy or Chief of the Apostles. Christ speaking only to Peter, reaffirms the mandate and role of his office (cf Isaiah 22:22):

  • Feed my lambs
  • Tend my sheep
  • Feed my sheep

Christ rounds out this passage with a clear and sobering statement of what will happen, not only personally to Peter but potentially to all who bear witness to Him and His glory.

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Reflections from the Saints: Cyril of Jerusalem on the Sign of the Cross

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Image via Wikipedia

SAINT CYRIL OF JERUSALEM, FRESCO AT A GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH

“We proclaim the Crucified and the devils quake. So don’t be ashamed of the cross of Christ. Openly seal it on your forehead that the devils may behold the royal sign and flee trembling far away. Make the Sign of the Cross when you eat or drink, when you sit, lie down or get up, when you speak, when you walk – in a word, at every act.”


How Does One Make The Sign of the Cross?

In western Catholicism, the Sign of the Cross is made as follows:

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Reflections from the Saints: Cyril of Jerusalem on the Sign of the Cross

Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, fresco at a greek or...Image via Wikipedia
SAINT CYRIL OF JERUSALEM, FRESCO AT A GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH

“We proclaim the Crucified and the devils quake. So don’t be ashamed of the cross of Christ. Openly seal it on your forehead that the devils may behold the royal sign and flee trembling far away. Make the Sign of the Cross when you eat or drink, when you sit, lie down or get up, when you speak, when you walk – in a word, at every act.”

How Does One Make The Sign of the Cross?

In western Catholicism, the Sign of the Cross is made as follows:

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Reflections from the Saints: Cyril of Jerusalem on Deeds

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Image via Wikipedia

Our actions have a tongue of their own; they have an eloquence of their own, even when the tongue is silent. For deeds prove the lover more than words.

St. Cyril of Jerusalem

via myCatholic.com » Customizable Catholic Homepage.

Reflections from the Saints: Cyril of Jerusalem on Deeds

Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, fresco at a greek or...

Our actions have a tongue of their own; they have an eloquence of their own, even when the tongue is silent. For deeds prove the lover more than words.

St. Cyril of Jerusalem

via myCatholic.com » Customizable Catholic Homepage.

Reflections from the Saints: Cyril of Jerusalem on the Real Presence

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St. Cyril of Jerusalem, who wrote so many catechetical homilies for the newly baptized. Image via HNC IK RM's Public Gallery.

“Since He Himself has declared and said of the bread: This is My Body, who shall dare to doubt any more?”

— Cyril, Bishop of Jerusalem, Doctor of the Church, Saint; unambiguous on the Real Presence (circa A.D. 347).

via Original Catholic Encyclopedia.

Reflections from the Saints: Cyril of Jerusalem on the Real Presence

St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Mt Holly Baptistry

“Since He Himself has declared and said of the bread: This is My Body, who shall dare to doubt any more?”

— Cyril, Bishop of Jerusalem, Doctor of the Church, Saint; unambiguous on the Real Presence (circa A.D. 347).

via Original Catholic Encyclopedia.

Clear Message Today: Come to Christ

Part of my morning routine usually includes a look at the daily Mass readings. I depend on myCatholic.com for this information. Like iGoogle and other similar services, myCatholic.com is a customizable homepage but for Catholics. The team that produced the site is doing a service for many of us and they should be congratulated on their good work and supported for their efforts.

MyCatholic.com also provides a WAP version of their homepage. While this is not customizable as of yet, they do provide the basics for any Catholic wishing to start their days “connected” to God. Of course there are the daily Mass readings, a saint of the day, a quote from a saint (usually corresponds to the saint of the day) but there is the added benefit of a daily Bible passage, inspiring words from St. Josemaria Escriva and most awesome, a paragraph from the Catechism of the Catholic Church. This all lends to a nice, rounded way to beginning a morning in education and reflection.

Anyway, this morning I found that all of the areas seemed to conjoin on the topic of Christ and coming to Him. The Eucharist as celebrated in Mass and in particular on the Lord’s Day are ways of coming to Christ.  I particularly like this passage from the Gospel reading: “You search the Scriptures, because you think you have eternal life through them; even they testify on my behalf. But you do not want to come to me to have life (John 5:39-40).”

Check out this glimpse of the mobile version of the myCatholic.com site (links and emphasis are mine):

Mass Readings: 3/18/2010

  • Gospel: John 5:31-47
  • Saint of the Day

    St. Cyril of Jerusalem (315-386)

    Cyril was a well-educated Christian priest raised in Jerusalem. He was a great instructor of catechumens. While the Bishop of Jerusalem, he was exiled three times. He was a Greek Father of the Church and a Doctor of the Church.

     

    St. Cyril of Jerusalem Speaks

    Since Christ Himself has said, “This is My Body” who shall dare to doubt that It is His Body?

    Scripture Verse of the Day

    Hebrews 11:6: And without faith it is impossible to please him, for whoever would draw near to God must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who seek him.

     

    The Words of St. Escriva

    The Struggle

    You are ashamed, before God, and before the others. You have discovered filth within yourself both old and renewed: there is no evil instinct or tendency that you do not feel under your skin. And you also carry a cloud of uncertainty in your heart. Furthermore, temptation arises when you least want it or expect it, when your will is weakened by tiredness.

     

    You no longer know whether it humiliates you, although it hurts you to see yourself like this. But let it hurt you because of Him, and for Love of Him. This contrition of love will help you to remain vigilant, for the fight will last as long as we live. (Furrow, #174)

    Catholic Catechism #2177

    The Sunday celebration of the Lord’s Day and his Eucharist is at the heart of the Church’s life. “Sunday is the day on which the paschal mystery is celebrated in light of the apostolic tradition and is to be observed as the foremost holy day of obligation in the universal Church.”