Tag Archives: Jesus Christ

Prayer to Mary, Mother of Women Hurt by Abortion

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Mary of Bethlehem and Nazareth,
  wife of Joseph,
Virgin mother of the Son of God made man,
  woman of sorrows, model of Faith,
You are our mother,
  living now in the joy of God’s presence.
You watch over each one of us
  with gentleness, compassion and tenderness.

We entrust all women hurt by abortion, and their
aborted children, to your motherly care.
May your unfailing love console our sisters,
  reassure them of their dignity, and be for them a
  source of healing, peace and joy. May they find
  comfort knowing their children are in your arms.

Protect and bless the work
  of women hurt by abortion.
Let it bring love and healing
  to your wounded daughters, and understanding
  to those who would help them.
May its members work with courage, dedication and
  perseverance to protect all women from the horror
  of aborting their children.

And may we all be united again with you in the
  presence of your Son, Jesus Christ, Our Lord.

Amen.

©1992 Human Life International

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Pope Benedict XVI says Psalms “prayer book par excellence”

AMMAN, JORDAN - MAY 09:  Pope Benedict XVI vis...

Pope Benedict XVI referred to the Psalms as the “prayer book par excellence,” as he spoke at his weekly general audience on June 22.

The 150 Psalms “express all human experience,” the Pope told the 10,000 people gathered in St. Peter’s Square for his Wednesday audience. Nevertheless, he continued, their diverse content can be reduced to two basic categories: petition (and/or lamentation) and praise. These two categories, he said, “intertwine and fuse together in a single song which celebrates the eternal grace of the Lord as He bows down to our frailty.”

With those to categories, the Pope said, the Book of Psalms “teach us to pray.” Those who prayerfully recite the Psalms “speak to God with the words of God, addressing Him with the words He Himself taught us.” He pointed out that Jesus used the Psalms in his own prayers.

The Psalms frequently offer some prefiguration of the Gospel story, the Pope observed; and they are cited often in the New Testament. Most of the Psalms are attributed to King David, who prefigured the Messiah. Pope Benedict said: “In Jesus Christ and in his paschal mystery the Psalms find their deepest meaning and prophetic fulfillment.”

via Catholic Culture | Psalms: the ultimate book of prayer

I do not know many who would argue against referring to the Psalms as a sort of “Cliff’s Notes” of our salvation history. Yet, I know not one Protestant who “prays” the Psalms claiming that doing so is tantamount to repetitious, vain prayer. Hogwash!

As the Pope rightly points out, the Psalms “express all human experience” and provides for us prayers and insight for all moments of our lives. There are prayers of deliverance such as Psalm 91, which can be used in direct combat with the Enemy (obviously this does not replace the need for an exorcist in the case of possession or other more serious demonic manifestations), Psalms of healing and of praise and of prophecy.

The Book of Psalms is the ultimate prayerbook for Christians!

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VIDEO: Impressive Eucharistic Miracle

H/T to TFP Student Action for reminding me of this testimony. The Eucharist is truly the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Blessed Lord, Jesus Christ!

“I am the bread of life…He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood abides in me, and I in him.”

–Jesus to His Disciples, John 6:48, 56

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“Be still, and know that I am God…”
Psalm 46:10
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VIDEO: Impressive Eucharistic Miracle

H/T to TFP Student Action for reminding me of this testimony. The Eucharist is truly the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Blessed Lord, Jesus Christ!

“I am the bread of life…He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood abides in me, and I in him.”

—Jesus to His Disciples, John 6:48, 56
“Be still, and know that I am God…”
Psalm 46:10
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Reflections From the Saints: Margaret Mary Alacoque

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“What a weakness it is to love Jesus Christ only when He Caresses us, and to be cold immediately once He afflicts us. This is not true love. Those who love thus, love themselves too much to love God with all their heart.”

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Read more: EWTN: Devotionals

 

Reflections From the Saints: Margaret Mary Alacoque

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“What a weakness it is to love Jesus Christ only when He Caresses us, and to be cold immediately once He afflicts us. This is not true love. Those who love thus, love themselves too much to love God with all their heart.”

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Read more: EWTN: Devotionals

 

Reflections From the Saints: Margaret Mary Alacoque

Marguerite Marie Alacoque

“What a weakness it is to love Jesus Christ only when He Caresses us, and to be cold immediately once He afflicts us. This is not true love. Those who love thus, love themselves too much to love God with all their heart.”

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Read more: EWTN: Devotionals

 

Dr. Ed Peters knows canon law. Whoopi Goldberg knows cliches.

H/T to Insight Scoop and CatholicVote.org on this.

What you are about to witness in this clip are people commenting on a subject that they a) do not know anything or much about and b) do not take seriously.

Those who know and understand that the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Blessed Lord, Jesus Christ, is really and truly present under the accidents of bread and wine are more than likely going to disagree with Dr. Peters. For the position expressed by Dr. Ed Peters is one that is clearly mentioned in Scripture:

Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord. Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself.

— 1 Corinthians 11:27-29

 

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1st collector for Dr. Ed Peters knows canon law. Whoopi Goldberg …
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This is the point of the issue. Cuomo and any other person who “eats and drinks…in an unworthy manner” does so at their own peril. Not because some are sinners and other are not but because partaking in this sacrilegious act demonstrates that the so-called communicant is not in full communion with the Church and her Bridegroom Jesus Christ.

Dr. Ed Peters knows canon law. Whoopi Goldberg knows cliches.

H/T to Insight Scoop and CatholicVote.org on this.

What you are about to witness in this clip are people commenting on a subject that they a) do not know anything or much about and b) do not take seriously.

Those who know and understand that the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Blessed Lord, Jesus Christ, is really and truly present under the accidents of bread and wine are more than likely going to disagree with Dr. Peters. For the position expressed by Dr. Ed Peters is one that is clearly mentioned in Scripture:

Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord. Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself.

— 1 Corinthians 11:27-29

Vodpod videos no longer available.

1st collector for Dr. Ed Peters knows canon law. Whoopi Goldberg …
Follow my videos on vodpod

This is the point of the issue. Cuomo and any other person who “eats and drinks…in an unworthy manner” does so at their own peril. Not because some are sinners and other are not but because partaking in this sacrilegious act demonstrates that the so-called communicant is not in full communion with the Church and her Bridegroom Jesus Christ.

Feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, apostle

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Christ Handing the Keys to St. Peter by Pietro Perugino (1481-82) Fresco. Image via Wikipedia.

This feast brings to mind the mission of teacher and pastor conferred by Christ on Peter, and continued in an unbroken line down to the present Pope. We celebrate the unity of the Church, founded upon the Apostle, and renew our assent to the Magisterium of the Roman Pontiff, extended both to truths which are solemnly defined ex cathedra, and to all the acts of the ordinary Magisterium.

The feast of the Chair of Saint Peter at Rome has been celebrated from the early days of the Christian era on 18 January, in commemoration of the day when Saint Peter held his first service in Rome. The feast of the Chair of Saint Peter at Antioch, commemorating his foundation of the See of Antioch, has also been long celebrated at Rome, on 22 February. At each place a chair (cathedra) was venerated which the Apostle had used while presiding at Mass. One of the chairs is referred to about 600 by an Abbot Johannes who had been commissioned by Pope Gregory the Great to collect in oil from the lamps which burned at the graves of the Roman martyrs. — New Catholic Dictionary


Daily Scripture Readings

First Reading 1 Pt 5:1-4
Beloved:

I exhort the presbyters among you, as a fellow presbyter and witness to the sufferings of Christ and one who has a share in the glory to be revealed. Tend the flock of God in your midst, overseeing not by constraint but willingly, as God would have it, not for shameful profit but eagerly. Do not lord it over those assigned to you, but be examples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd is revealed, you will receive the unfading crown of glory.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 23:1-3a, 4, 5, 6
R. (1) The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
In verdant pastures he gives me repose;
Beside restful waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.

R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

Even though I walk in the dark valley
I fear no evil; for you are at my side
With your rod and your staff
that give me courage.

R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

You spread the table before me
in the sight of my foes;
You anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.

R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

Only goodness and kindness follow me
all the days of my life;
And I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
for years to come.

R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

Gospel Mt 16:13-19
When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter said in reply, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus said to him in reply, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father. And so I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys to the Kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

Readings courtesy of the USCCB.


Chair of St. Peter
Since early times, the Roman Church has had a special commemoration of the primatial authority of St. Peter. As witness one of the most renowned of the Apostolic Fathers, the Roman See has always held a peculiar place in the affection and obedience of orthodox believers because of its “presiding in love” and service over all the Churches of God.

“We shall find in the Gospel that Jesus Christ, willing to begin the mystery of unity in His Church, among all His disciples chose twelve; but that, willing to consummate the mystery of unity in the same Church, among the twelve He chose one. He called His disciples, said the Gospel; here are all; and among them He chose twelve. Here is the first separation, and the Apostles chosen. And these are the names of the twelve Apostles: the first, Simon, who is called Peter. [Mt. 10, 1-2] Here, in a second separation, St. Peter is set at the head, and called for that reason by the name of Peter, ‘which Jesus Christ,’ says St. Mark, ‘had given him,’ in order to prepare, as you will see, the work which He was proposing to raise all His building on that stone.

“All this is yet but a beginning of the mystery of unity. Jesus Christ, in beginning it, still spoke to many: Go, preach; I send you [see Mt. 28, 19]. Now, when He would put the last hand to the mystery of unity, He speaks no longer to many: He marks out Peter personally, and by the new name which He has given him. It is One who speaks to one: Jesus Christ the Son of God to Simon son of Jonas; Jesus Christ, who is the true Stone, strong of Himself, to Simon, who is only the stone by the strength which Jesus Christ imparts to him. It is to him that Christ speaks, and in speaking acts on him, and stamps upon him His own immovableness. And I, He says, say to you, you are Peter; and, He adds, upon this rock I will build my Church, and, He concludes, the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. [Mt. 16, 18] To prepare him for that honor Jesus Christ, who knows that faith in Himself is the foundation of His Church, inspires Peter with a faith worthy to be the foundation of that admirable building. You are the Christ, the Son of the living God. [Mt. 16, 16] By that bold preaching of the faith he draws to himself the inviolable promise which makes him the foundation of the Church.

“It was, then, clearly the design of Jesus Christ to put first in one alone, what afterwards He meant to put in several; but the sequence does not reverse the beginning, nor the first lose his place. That first word, Whatsoever you shall bind, said to one alone, has already ranged under his power each one of those to whom shall be said, Whatsoever you shall remit; for the promises of Jesus Christ, as well as His gift, are without repentance; and what is once given indefinitely and universally is irrevocable. Besides, that power given to several carries its restriction in its division, while power given to one alone, and over all, and without exception, carries with it plenitude, and, not having to be divided with any other, it has no bounds save those which its terms convey.”

Excerpted from The See of St. Peter, Jacques Bossuet.

Narrative courtesy of Catholic Culture.