Tag Archives: Josemaría Escrivá

One Minute Mediations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Listening to God

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Coming closer to God means being ready to be converted anew, to change direction again, to listen attentively to his inspirations – those holy desires he places in our souls – and to put them into practice.

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #32
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One Minute Mediations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Listening to God

St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Pri...Image via Wikipedia

Coming closer to God means being ready to be converted anew, to change direction again, to listen attentively to his inspirations – those holy desires he places in our souls – and to put them into practice.

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #32
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One Minute Meditations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Church Unity

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Josemaria Escriva as a teenager.

“Convince yourself, my child, that lack of unity within the Church is death.”

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #631
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One Minute Meditations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Church Unity

As a teenager, St. Josemaría experienced "...Image via Wikipedia
Josemaria Escriva as a teenager.

“Convince yourself, my child, that lack of unity within the Church is death.”

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #631
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One Minute Meditations: Madness for Christ

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Sweet Mother, lead us to that madness that will make others fall madly in love with our Christ

Sweet Lady Mary, may Love not be in us a flash in the pan, or a will-o’–the-wisp, such as decomposing corpses sometimes produce. May it be a true devouring fire, which sets alight and burns everything it touches.

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One Minute Meditations: Madness for Christ

Saint Josemaria EscrivaImage via Wikipedia

Sweet Mother, lead us to that madness that will make others fall madly in love with our Christ

Sweet Lady Mary, may Love not be in us a flash in the pan, or a will-o’–the-wisp, such as decomposing corpses sometimes produce. May it be a true devouring fire, which sets alight and burns everything it touches.

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One Minute Meditations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Work

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The Lord wants his children, those of us who have received the gift of faith, to proclaim the original optimistic view of creation, the love for the world which is at the heart of the Christian message.

So there should always be enthusiasm in your professional work, and in your effort to build up the earthly city.

 

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #703

 

One Minute Meditations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Work

St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Pri...

The Lord wants his children, those of us who have received the gift of faith, to proclaim the original optimistic view of creation, the love for the world which is at the heart of the Christian message.

So there should always be enthusiasm in your professional work, and in your effort to build up the earthly city.

 

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #703

 

One Minute Meditations: St. Joesemaria Escriva on Idleness

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St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Priestly Society of the Holy Cross. Image via Wikipedia.

By neglecting small details you could work on and on without rest and yet live the life of a perfect idler.

– St. Josemaria Escriva, Furrow, #494


What is idleness?

According to Fr. John Hardon‘s Modern Catholic Dictionary (as found on CatholicCulture.org) defines idleness as:

Unwillingness to work. The reason may be physical, because a person lacks the strength; or mental, because one does not know what to do; or moral, because of laziness that will not expend the effort needed perhaps even to begin a task or at least perform it as it should be done.

Why is being unwilling to work bad?

Basically it boils down to shirking one’s responsibilities. If you are being paid to do something and you do not do it, then the Church teaches that it is the equivalent to stealing, assuming that it is all above-board of course.

Something else to consider is the phrase “idle hands/minds are the devil’s workshop/playground.” This phrase makes perfect theological sense especially in light of Scripture and Tradition:

Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you keep away from any brother who is living in idleness and not in accord with the tradition that you received from us. For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, we did not eat any one’s bread without paying, but with toil and labor we worked night and day, that we might not burden any of you. It was not because we have not that right, but to give you in our conduct an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: If any one will not work, let him not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work. Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work in quietness and to earn their own living. Brethren, do not be weary in well-doing.

2 Thessalonians (RSV) 3:6-13

One Minute Meditations: St. Joesemaria Escriva on Idleness

St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Pri...

By neglecting small details you could work on and on without rest and yet live the life of a perfect idler.

– St. Josemaria Escriva, Furrow, #494

What is idleness?

According to Fr. John Hardon’s Modern Catholic Dictionary (as found on CatholicCulture.org) defines idleness as:

Unwillingness to work. The reason may be physical, because a person lacks the strength; or mental, because one does not know what to do; or moral, because of laziness that will not expend the effort needed perhaps even to begin a task or at least perform it as it should be done.

Why is being unwilling to work bad?

Basically it boils down to shirking one’s responsibilities. If you are being paid to do something and you do not do it, then the Church teaches that it is the equivalent to stealing, assuming that it is all above-board of course.

Something else to consider is the phrase “idle hands/minds are the devil’s workshop/playground.” This phrase makes perfect theological sense especially in light of Scripture and Tradition:

Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you keep away from any brother who is living in idleness and not in accord with the tradition that you received from us. For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, we did not eat any one’s bread without paying, but with toil and labor we worked night and day, that we might not burden any of you. It was not because we have not that right, but to give you in our conduct an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: If any one will not work, let him not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work. Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work in quietness and to earn their own living. Brethren, do not be weary in well-doing.

2 Thessalonians (RSV) 3:6-13