Tag Archives: Last Judgment

The Weekend Forecast: Partly Cloudy Skies with a Chance of Being Left Behind

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Image by Getty Images via @daylifeAccording to “self-taught biblical scholar and radio mogulHarold Camping the Just Judge, Jesus Christ, will return on May 21, 2011 “at exactly 6 p.m. local time, whatever your local time is. He’s been delivering this prediction for several years, a recalibration from his earlier prediction that the Rapture would happen in 1994″ (Preachers Line Up Against May 21 Leader).

It is amazing to me that people will believe false prophets such as these even while considering themselves Christians. Persons such as Mr. Camping are, by definition, antichrist[1]. Not in the sense of some horror movie but in the true sense that the Gospel they preach is not that which was preached by the Apostles[2] who are the foundation[3] of the Church.

Mr. Camping’s false prediction back in 1994 already shows him as a failed prophet and antichrist, especially since he continues to preach this falsity in clear opposition to Jesus’ own words. Speaking of the Eschaton, Christ states, “But of that day or that hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father” (Mark (RSV) 13:32).

Then of course there is the false and very recent teaching of the “Rapture.” This idea has become wildly popular since the publication of the Left Behind series of novels. I think most would agree that the author of these books took inspiration from the Book of Revelation and Protestant theology that twisted Bible passages such as 1 Thessalonians 4:17, which says, “…then we who are alive, who are left, shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air; and so we shall always be with the Lord.”

Those who hold to this recent theological theory (about 150 to 200 years old) that has no basis in Sacred Scripture and/or Sacred Tradition will read 1 Thessalonians 4:17 and point the passage as clear evidence of the “Rapture” as they know it. And as they know it divided. This division of teaching shows evidence against Sola Scriptura and shows Protestantism for what it is: Christianity without the Fullness of Truth.
In the eternal wisdom granted her by Christ, the Church has always taught us that:
The Last Judgment will come when Christ returns in glory. Only the Father knows the day and the hour; only he determines the moment of its coming. Then through his Son Jesus Christ he will pronounce the final word on all history. We shall know the ultimate meaning of the whole work of creation and of the entire economy of salvation and understand the marvellous ways by which his Providence led everything towards its final end. The Last Judgment will reveal that God’s justice triumphs over all the injustices committed by his creatures and that God’s love is stronger than death.(Song of Songs 8:6[4]) (1997 Catechism of the Catholic Church 1040)
What does this mean for us? Well, basically it means that properly catechised Catholics (Christians since AD33) understand that there will only be ONE Second Coming of Jesus and that we are effectively living in the Amillennial period, which is in the Glorious reign of Our Lord – for we are living in a time of Grace. All of this Grace, of course, begins and ends with the mystery of the Holy Eucharist – the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Blessed Lord Jesus Christ under that appearances of bread and wine.

Anyway, Camping is wrong and preaches a gospel that is not of Our Lord. Saint Peter speaks of persons such as this in 2 Peter 2:1:
But false prophets also arose among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, even denying the Master who bought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction. And many will follow their licentiousness, and because of them the way of truth will be reviled.
And in their greed they will exploit you with false words… (2 Peter (RSV) 2:1-3a)

[1]Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are of God; for many false prophets have gone out into the world. By this you know the Spirit of God: every spirit which confesses that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is of God, and every spirit which does not confess Jesus is not of God. This is the spirit of antichrist, of which you heard that it was coming, and now it is in the world already. (1John (RSV) 4:1-3)
[2]I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and turning to a different gospel — not that there is another gospel, but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ. But even if we, or an angel from heaven, should preach to you a gospel contrary to that which we preached to you, let him be accursed. As we have said before, so now I say again, If any one is preaching to you a gospel contrary to that which you received, let him be accursed. (Galatians (RSV) 1:6-9)
[3]So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; in whom you also are built into it for a dwelling place of God in the Spirit. (Ephesians (RSV) 2:19-22)
[4]Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm; for love is strong as death, jealousy is cruel as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a most vehement flame. (Song of Songs (RSV) 8:6)
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The Weekend Forecast: Partly Cloudy Skies with a Chance of Being Left Behind

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 13:  Participants in a move...Image by Getty Images via @daylifeAccording to “self-taught biblical scholar and radio mogulHarold Camping the Just Judge, Jesus Christ, will return on May 21, 2011 “at exactly 6 p.m. local time, whatever your local time is. He’s been delivering this prediction for several years, a recalibration from his earlier prediction that the Rapture would happen in 1994” (Preachers Line Up Against May 21 Leader).

It is amazing to me that people will believe false prophets such as these even while considering themselves Christians. Persons such as Mr. Camping are, by definition, antichrist[1]. Not in the sense of some horror movie but in the true sense that the Gospel they preach is not that which was preached by the Apostles[2] who are the foundation[3] of the Church.

Mr. Camping’s false prediction back in 1994 already shows him as a failed prophet and antichrist, especially since he continues to preach this falsity in clear opposition to Jesus’ own words. Speaking of the Eschaton, Christ states, “But of that day or that hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father” (Mark (RSV) 13:32).

Then of course there is the false and very recent teaching of the “Rapture.” This idea has become wildly popular since the publication of the Left Behind series of novels. I think most would agree that the author of these books took inspiration from the Book of Revelation and Protestant theology that twisted Bible passages such as 1 Thessalonians 4:17, which says, “…then we who are alive, who are left, shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air; and so we shall always be with the Lord.”

Those who hold to this recent theological theory (about 150 to 200 years old) that has no basis in Sacred Scripture and/or Sacred Tradition will read 1 Thessalonians 4:17 and point the passage as clear evidence of the “Rapture” as they know it. And as they know it divided. This division of teaching shows evidence against Sola Scriptura and shows Protestantism for what it is: Christianity without the Fullness of Truth.
In the eternal wisdom granted her by Christ, the Church has always taught us that:
The Last Judgment will come when Christ returns in glory. Only the Father knows the day and the hour; only he determines the moment of its coming. Then through his Son Jesus Christ he will pronounce the final word on all history. We shall know the ultimate meaning of the whole work of creation and of the entire economy of salvation and understand the marvellous ways by which his Providence led everything towards its final end. The Last Judgment will reveal that God’s justice triumphs over all the injustices committed by his creatures and that God’s love is stronger than death.(Song of Songs 8:6[4]) (1997 Catechism of the Catholic Church 1040)
What does this mean for us? Well, basically it means that properly catechised Catholics (Christians since AD33) understand that there will only be ONE Second Coming of Jesus and that we are effectively living in the Amillennial period, which is in the Glorious reign of Our Lord – for we are living in a time of Grace. All of this Grace, of course, begins and ends with the mystery of the Holy Eucharist – the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Blessed Lord Jesus Christ under that appearances of bread and wine.

Anyway, Camping is wrong and preaches a gospel that is not of Our Lord. Saint Peter speaks of persons such as this in 2 Peter 2:1:
But false prophets also arose among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, even denying the Master who bought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction. And many will follow their licentiousness, and because of them the way of truth will be reviled.
And in their greed they will exploit you with false words… (2 Peter (RSV) 2:1-3a)

[1]Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are of God; for many false prophets have gone out into the world. By this you know the Spirit of God: every spirit which confesses that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is of God, and every spirit which does not confess Jesus is not of God. This is the spirit of antichrist, of which you heard that it was coming, and now it is in the world already. (1John (RSV) 4:1-3)
[2]I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and turning to a different gospel — not that there is another gospel, but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ. But even if we, or an angel from heaven, should preach to you a gospel contrary to that which we preached to you, let him be accursed. As we have said before, so now I say again, If any one is preaching to you a gospel contrary to that which you received, let him be accursed. (Galatians (RSV) 1:6-9)
[3]So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; in whom you also are built into it for a dwelling place of God in the Spirit. (Ephesians (RSV) 2:19-22)
[4]Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm; for love is strong as death, jealousy is cruel as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a most vehement flame. (Song of Songs (RSV) 8:6)
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Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Lazarus and the Rich Man. Image via Catholic Culture.

There was a rich man who dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day. And lying at his door was a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Prophet Amos 6:1a, 4-7. This warning of the prophet Amos, who was only an uneducated shepherd before God called him to the prophetic ministry, does not come from Amos but from God, in whose name he spoke. God’s Chosen People, to whom he had in his goodness given the land of Canaan to be their homeland for all time, were about to lose their land and their freedom, because they had forgotten their divine Benefactor and thought only of themselves and their own comfort.

The second reading is from the first letter of St. Paul to Timothy 6:11-16. In these verses St. Paul is exhorting Timothy to strive to become daily more perfect in his observance of the Christian faith. He had made a public and noble profession of that faith on the occasion of his baptism as a young man. He must continue to profess it.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 16:19-31. We have here a story of two men whose states, both in this life and in the next, are dramatically opposed. The rich man had everything a man could desire on this earth and he set his heart on this wealth, to such a degree that he excluded all thought of God or of what followed after death. It was not that he was ignorant of God or of a future life (our Lord was addressing the parable to the Pharisees); he admits that he had Moses and the prophets, but he paid no heed to them. He was too busy trying to squeeze the last ounce of pleasure out of his few years on earth.

On the other half of the picture we have a beggar, a man not only in dire destitution, but suffering bodily pains as well. He bore his lot patiently. He was quite content if he got the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table, which he probably did not always get. He must have been disappointed that this rich man never thought of giving him a helping hand but there is no mention of his ever criticizing or blaming him. He left these things to God.

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Both men die eventually. The beggar goes straight to heaven to a state of endless happiness. His bodily sufferings have ended forever, he will never be in want again. The rich man fares very differently. His enjoyments are over forever. He is now in torments and he is told that he can expect no relief. They will have no end. Abraham tells him why he is in his present state: he abused his time on earth. He sees the truth of this. He knows that he has no one to blame but himself which must add greatly to his torments. It is also a cause of additional grief to him that his bad example will lead his brothers (his fellowmen) to a like fate.

All the parables of our Lord are based on everyday happenings. While we hope and pray that the case of the rich man described here is not an everyday occurrence, we cannot doubt but that such cases have happened and will happen again. This rich man is not in eternal torments because he was rich and even very rich. He is in eternal torments because he let his wealth become his master and forgot God and his neighbor and his own real welfare — eternal life. There are men like him in our world today, men who completely ignore their real future. While they are convinced that their stay on this earth is of very short duration and that they will have to leave it very, very soon, they still act and live as if they had a permanent home here.

This is true not only of those who try (ineffectively most probably) to keep from their minds all thought of a future life, but even of some who openly profess to be Christians and who recite so often the words of the Creed: “I believe in the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.” Yet, they are so busy trying to get the wealth and the pleasures of this life, or to increase all they have of them already, that they haven’t a moment to spare for the thing that really matters-their future unending life after death.

God forbid that any of us should be numbered amongst these foolish people, for there is no greater folly on earth than to miss the real and only purpose in life because of a few trivial, passing attractions. We are not forbidden to have some of this world’s goods. We need some, and God it was who provided them for our use. But we must use them properly and we must not set them up as idols to be adored. On all sides of us there are Lazaruses placed at our gates by God to give us an opportunity to exercise fraternal charity. Be a true brother to them now and you will not have to envy them hereafter.

If on the other hand your lot is that of a Lazarus—and many there are whose life is one long, continual struggle against poverty, disease and hardship —try to carry your cross patiently. Envy of your neighbor and rebellion against God will only add to, and do not cure, your ills. The day of judgment, which for you will be the day of reward, if you are humble and patient, is around the comer. Eternal happiness is worth twenty lives of earthly ill-fortune.

— Excerpted from The Sunday Readings Cycle C, Fr. Kevin O’ Sullivan, O.F.M.

Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lazarus and the Rich Man. Image via Catholic Culture.
Lazarus and the Rich Man. Image via Catholic Culture.

There was a rich man who dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day. And lying at his door was a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Prophet Amos 6:1a, 4-7. This warning of the prophet Amos, who was only an uneducated shepherd before God called him to the prophetic ministry, does not come from Amos but from God, in whose name he spoke. God’s Chosen People, to whom he had in his goodness given the land of Canaan to be their homeland for all time, were about to lose their land and their freedom, because they had forgotten their divine Benefactor and thought only of themselves and their own comfort.

The second reading is from the first letter of St. Paul to Timothy 6:11-16. In these verses St. Paul is exhorting Timothy to strive to become daily more perfect in his observance of the Christian faith. He had made a public and noble profession of that faith on the occasion of his baptism as a young man. He must continue to profess it.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 16:19-31. We have here a story of two men whose states, both in this life and in the next, are dramatically opposed. The rich man had everything a man could desire on this earth and he set his heart on this wealth, to such a degree that he excluded all thought of God or of what followed after death. It was not that he was ignorant of God or of a future life (our Lord was addressing the parable to the Pharisees); he admits that he had Moses and the prophets, but he paid no heed to them. He was too busy trying to squeeze the last ounce of pleasure out of his few years on earth.

On the other half of the picture we have a beggar, a man not only in dire destitution, but suffering bodily pains as well. He bore his lot patiently. He was quite content if he got the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table, which he probably did not always get. He must have been disappointed that this rich man never thought of giving him a helping hand but there is no mention of his ever criticizing or blaming him. He left these things to God.

Both men die eventually. The beggar goes straight to heaven to a state of endless happiness. His bodily sufferings have ended forever, he will never be in want again. The rich man fares very differently. His enjoyments are over forever. He is now in torments and he is told that he can expect no relief. They will have no end. Abraham tells him why he is in his present state: he abused his time on earth. He sees the truth of this. He knows that he has no one to blame but himself which must add greatly to his torments. It is also a cause of additional grief to him that his bad example will lead his brothers (his fellowmen) to a like fate.

All the parables of our Lord are based on everyday happenings. While we hope and pray that the case of the rich man described here is not an everyday occurrence, we cannot doubt but that such cases have happened and will happen again. This rich man is not in eternal torments because he was rich and even very rich. He is in eternal torments because he let his wealth become his master and forgot God and his neighbor and his own real welfare — eternal life. There are men like him in our world today, men who completely ignore their real future. While they are convinced that their stay on this earth is of very short duration and that they will have to leave it very, very soon, they still act and live as if they had a permanent home here.

This is true not only of those who try (ineffectively most probably) to keep from their minds all thought of a future life, but even of some who openly profess to be Christians and who recite so often the words of the Creed: “I believe in the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.” Yet, they are so busy trying to get the wealth and the pleasures of this life, or to increase all they have of them already, that they haven’t a moment to spare for the thing that really matters-their future unending life after death.

God forbid that any of us should be numbered amongst these foolish people, for there is no greater folly on earth than to miss the real and only purpose in life because of a few trivial, passing attractions. We are not forbidden to have some of this world’s goods. We need some, and God it was who provided them for our use. But we must use them properly and we must not set them up as idols to be adored. On all sides of us there are Lazaruses placed at our gates by God to give us an opportunity to exercise fraternal charity. Be a true brother to them now and you will not have to envy them hereafter.

If on the other hand your lot is that of a Lazarus—and many there are whose life is one long, continual struggle against poverty, disease and hardship —try to carry your cross patiently. Envy of your neighbor and rebellion against God will only add to, and do not cure, your ills. The day of judgment, which for you will be the day of reward, if you are humble and patient, is around the comer. Eternal happiness is worth twenty lives of earthly ill-fortune.

— Excerpted from The Sunday Readings Cycle C, Fr. Kevin O’ Sullivan, O.F.M.

Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lazarus and the Rich Man. Image via Catholic Culture.

There was a rich man who dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day. And lying at his door was a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Prophet Amos 6:1a, 4-7. This warning of the prophet Amos, who was only an uneducated shepherd before God called him to the prophetic ministry, does not come from Amos but from God, in whose name he spoke. God’s Chosen People, to whom he had in his goodness given the land of Canaan to be their homeland for all time, were about to lose their land and their freedom, because they had forgotten their divine Benefactor and thought only of themselves and their own comfort.

The second reading is from the first letter of St. Paul to Timothy 6:11-16. In these verses St. Paul is exhorting Timothy to strive to become daily more perfect in his observance of the Christian faith. He had made a public and noble profession of that faith on the occasion of his baptism as a young man. He must continue to profess it.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 16:19-31. We have here a story of two men whose states, both in this life and in the next, are dramatically opposed. The rich man had everything a man could desire on this earth and he set his heart on this wealth, to such a degree that he excluded all thought of God or of what followed after death. It was not that he was ignorant of God or of a future life (our Lord was addressing the parable to the Pharisees); he admits that he had Moses and the prophets, but he paid no heed to them. He was too busy trying to squeeze the last ounce of pleasure out of his few years on earth.

On the other half of the picture we have a beggar, a man not only in dire destitution, but suffering bodily pains as well. He bore his lot patiently. He was quite content if he got the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table, which he probably did not always get. He must have been disappointed that this rich man never thought of giving him a helping hand but there is no mention of his ever criticizing or blaming him. He left these things to God.

Both men die eventually. The beggar goes straight to heaven to a state of endless happiness. His bodily sufferings have ended forever, he will never be in want again. The rich man fares very differently. His enjoyments are over forever. He is now in torments and he is told that he can expect no relief. They will have no end. Abraham tells him why he is in his present state: he abused his time on earth. He sees the truth of this. He knows that he has no one to blame but himself which must add greatly to his torments. It is also a cause of additional grief to him that his bad example will lead his brothers (his fellowmen) to a like fate.

All the parables of our Lord are based on everyday happenings. While we hope and pray that the case of the rich man described here is not an everyday occurrence, we cannot doubt but that such cases have happened and will happen again. This rich man is not in eternal torments because he was rich and even very rich. He is in eternal torments because he let his wealth become his master and forgot God and his neighbor and his own real welfare — eternal life. There are men like him in our world today, men who completely ignore their real future. While they are convinced that their stay on this earth is of very short duration and that they will have to leave it very, very soon, they still act and live as if they had a permanent home here.

This is true not only of those who try (ineffectively most probably) to keep from their minds all thought of a future life, but even of some who openly profess to be Christians and who recite so often the words of the Creed: “I believe in the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.” Yet, they are so busy trying to get the wealth and the pleasures of this life, or to increase all they have of them already, that they haven’t a moment to spare for the thing that really matters-their future unending life after death.

God forbid that any of us should be numbered amongst these foolish people, for there is no greater folly on earth than to miss the real and only purpose in life because of a few trivial, passing attractions. We are not forbidden to have some of this world’s goods. We need some, and God it was who provided them for our use. But we must use them properly and we must not set them up as idols to be adored. On all sides of us there are Lazaruses placed at our gates by God to give us an opportunity to exercise fraternal charity. Be a true brother to them now and you will not have to envy them hereafter.

If on the other hand your lot is that of a Lazarus—and many there are whose life is one long, continual struggle against poverty, disease and hardship —try to carry your cross patiently. Envy of your neighbor and rebellion against God will only add to, and do not cure, your ills. The day of judgment, which for you will be the day of reward, if you are humble and patient, is around the comer. Eternal happiness is worth twenty lives of earthly ill-fortune.

— Excerpted from The Sunday Readings Cycle C, Fr. Kevin O’ Sullivan, O.F.M.