Tag Archives: Lord

FoundNation » Universal

I was fortunate to discover this group while listening to the Catholic Rockers podcast, produced by SQPN. In any event, as has been my experience with most “praise” Catholic musicians they bring every experience the Lord has allowed them to the table in his honor and leave nothing to be desired.

FoundNation is more than just a rap group. It is a group of men, driven by their Christian identity, to serve others, and make God known to them through their lives and their music.

This new group that spans to all the borders of the United States is not only bringing a new sound to Christian rap but is also setting a high bar for catholic rap. The 3 artists with the stage names of Thot, Dy-verse, and C2six have many years of ministry, from the local level of parish ministry with CCD and catechetical teachers to street ministry with gang intervention and street witnessing. After pursuing solo careers in the hip-hop world, they crossed paths through the indie Catholic rap label Phatmass, and quickly bonded as artists and friends. Desiring to bring change to the lives of individuals, their communities, and their own personal lives as they continuously sought to live out their Catholic-Christian faith, these young men became the group called FoundNation.

With their individual talents, they seek to bring light into a dark world, through rhymes, beats and songs. The sounds represented from the group come from “tha South” and also from a “latin” rap mixed with a “now-pop” sound, the music is definitely engineered for our street youth but enjoyable for all ages and backgrounds.

Check them out:


FoundNation » Universal
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Optional Memorial of St. Maria Goretti, virgin and martyr

St. Maria Goretti (painting 1929)

Oh Saint Maria Goretti who, strengthened by God’s grace, did not hesitate even at the age of twelve to shed your blood and sacrifice life itself to defend your virginal purity, look graciously on the unhappy human race which has strayed far from the path of eternal salvation. Teach us all, and especially youth,with what courage and promptitude we should flee for the love of Jesus anything that could offend Him or stain our souls with sin. Obtain for us from our Lord victory in temptation, comfort in the sorrows of life, and the grace which we earnestly beg of thee (here insert intention), and may we one day enjoy with thee the imperishable glory of Heaven. Amen.

— Prayer to St. Maria Goretti


Read the Bible at Mass

First Reading: Gn 41:55-57; 42:5-7a, 17-24a

When hunger came to be felt throughout the land of Egypt and the people cried to Pharaoh for bread, Pharaoh directed all the Egyptians to go to Joseph and do whatever he told them. When the famine had spread throughout the land, Joseph opened all the cities that had grain and rationed it to the Egyptians, since the famine had gripped the land of Egypt. In fact, all the world came to Joseph to obtain rations of grain, for famine had gripped the whole world.

The sons of Israel were among those who came to procure rations.

It was Joseph, as governor of the country, who dispensed the rations to all the people. When Joseph’s brothers came and knelt down before him with their faces to the ground, he recognized them as soon as he saw them. But Joseph concealed his own identity from them and spoke sternly to them.

With that, he locked them up in the guardhouse for three days.

On the third day Joseph said to his brothers:

“Do this, and you shall live; for I am a God-fearing man. If you have been honest, only one of your brothers need be confined in this prison, while the rest of you may go and take home provisions for your starving families. But you must come back to me with your youngest brother. Your words will thus be verified, and you will not die.”

To this they agreed. To one another, however, they said:

“Alas, we are being punished because of our brother. We saw the anguish of his heart when he pleaded with us, yet we paid no heed; that is why this anguish has now come upon us.”

Reuben broke in, “Did I not tell you not to do wrong to the boy? But you would not listen! Now comes the reckoning for his blood.” The brothers did not know, of course, that Joseph understood what they said, since he spoke with them through an interpreter. But turning away from them, he wept.

Responsorial Psalm33:2-3, 10-11, 18-19

R. (22) Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

Give thanks to the LORD on the harp;
with the ten-stringed lyre chant his praises.
Sing to him a new song;
pluck the strings skillfully, with shouts of gladness.

R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

The LORD brings to nought the plans of nations;
he foils the designs of peoples.
But the plan of the LORD stands forever;
the design of his heart, through all generations.

R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

But see, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,
upon those who hope for his kindness,
To deliver them from death
and preserve them in spite of famine.

R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.


Gospel Reading: Mt 10:1-7

Jesus summoned his Twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits to drive them out and to cure every disease and every illness. The names of the Twelve Apostles are these:

First, Simon called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James, the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddeus; Simon the Cananean, and Judas Iscariot who betrayed Jesus.

Jesus sent out these Twelve after instructing them thus, “Do not go into pagan territory or enter a Samaritan town. Go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, make this proclamation: ‘The Kingdom of heaven is at hand.’”


About St. Maria Goretti

St. Maria Goretti was born of a poor family in Corinaldi, Italy, in 1890. Near Nettuno she spent a difficult childhood assisting her mother in domestic duties. She was of a pious nature and often at prayer. In 1902 she was stabbed to death, preferring to die rather than be raped. (Office of Readings)

“It is well known how this young girl had to face a bitter struggle with no way to defend herself. Without warning a vicious stranger (actually Alessandro Serenelli who lived with his father in the same house as the Goretti’s.) burst upon her, bent on raping her and destroying her childlike purity. In that moment of crisis she could have spoken to her Redeemer in the words of that classic, The Imitation of Christ: “Though tested and plagued by a host of misfortunes, I have no fear so long as your grace is with me. It is my strength, stronger than any adversary; it helps me and gives me guidance.” With splendid courage she surrendered herself to God and his grace and so gave her life to protect her virginity.

“The life of this simple girl—I shall concern myself only with highlights—we can see as worthy of heaven. Even today people can look upon it with admiration and respect. Parents can learn from her story how to raise their God-given children in virtue, courage and holiness; they can learn to train them in the Catholic faith so that, when put to the test, God’s grace will support them and they will come through undefeated, unscathed and untarnished.

“From Maria’s story carefree children and young people with their zest for life can learn not to be led astray by attractive pleasures which are not only ephemeral and empty but also sinful. Instead they can fix their sights on achieving Christian moral perfection, however difficult and hazardous that course may prove. With determination and God’s help all of us can attain that goal by persistent effort and prayer.

“Not all of us are expected to die a martyr’s death, but we are all called to the pursuit of Christian virtue. This demands strength of character though it may not match that of this innocent girl. Still, a constant, persistent and relentless effort is asked of us right up to the moment of our death. This may be conceived as a slow steady martyrdom which Christ urged upon us when he said: The kingdom of heaven is set upon and laid waste by violent forces.

“So let us all, with God’s grace, strive to reach the goal that the example of the virgin martyr, Saint Maria Goretti, sets before us. Through her prayers to the Redeemer may all of us, each in his own way, joyfully try to follow the inspiring example of Maria Goretti who now enjoys eternal happiness in heaven.”

Excerpted from a homily at the canonization of Saint Maria Goretti by Pope Pius XII

Patron: Against impoverishment; against poverty; children; children of Mary; girls; loss of parents; martyrs; rape victims; young people in general.

Things to Do:

  • Please visit this site for a more detailed account of St. Maria Goretti’s life and Alessandro Serenelli’s conversion.
  • This saint’s feast day is a wonderful launching point to teach our children about purity, chastity and modesty. Sex education should be taught by the parents with a Catholic approach. Young girls can use St. Maria as a model.
  • A highly recommended book is St. Maria Goretti: In Garments All Red by Rev. Godfrey Poage. Young teens to adult will enjoy this account of her life.

via Catholic Culture

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This is My Body: Jesus Institutes the Eucharist

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Jesus with the Eucharist (detail),
mid-late 16th century.
Image via  Wikipedia.

Then he took the bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which will be given for you; do this in memory of me.” And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which will be shed for you.”

— Our Blessed Lord, Luke 22:19-20 (NAB)

Sent via iMissal App iTunes AppStore: http://bit.ly/eYW5KC Android Marketplace: http://bit.ly/gtxzWb

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This is My Body: Jesus Institutes the Eucharist

Jesus with the Eucharist (detail),
mid-late 16th century.
Image via  Wikipedia.

Then he took the bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body, which will be given for you; do this in memory of me.” And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which will be shed for you.”

— Our Blessed Lord, Luke 22:19-20 (NAB)

Sent via iMissal App iTunes AppStore: http://bit.ly/eYW5KC Android Marketplace: http://bit.ly/gtxzWb

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Catholic Cheat Sheet on Regenerative Baptism

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Baptism of Christ, fragment from the Catacombs of Marcellinus and Peter, c. 330. Image via Wikipedia.

Look mom, my blog was mentioned on another Catholic apologist’s blog! And it’s one that I subscribe to. Now this is not the first time this has occurred but it is still pretty cool.

As I was going through my Google Reader list, I came across the following post:

The Biblical Basis for Regenerative Baptism
My niece is getting baptized this weekend, so I thought I’d dedicate this post to her, and to the awesome power of Baptism. The blog Jesus, I Trust in You has a very good “Catholic Cheat Sheet.”  It’s a quick go-to guide of Scriptural support in favor of given Church teachings.

via Shameless Popery: The Biblical Basis for Regenerative Baptism.

The bulk of the post highlights the verses speaking to regenerative baptism but, as I would expect from any blog called Shameless Popery, blogger Joe Heschmeyer even adds a new verse and provides some insight why.

How cool is this?

In addition to these, I would add Ezekiel 36:24-28. In it, God promises that the Day is coming when He’ll unite Him people through a regenerative washing in pure water by the power of the Holy Spirit, and that after it, we will be His people, and He will be Our God:

“For I will take you out of the nations; I will gather you from all the countries and bring you back into your own land. I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be cleanI will cleanse you from all your impurities and from all your idols. I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put My Spirit in you and move you to follow My decrees and be careful to keep My laws. Then you will live in the land I gave your ancestors; you will be my people, and I will be your God.”

I can’t think of anything more regenerative than God creating in us “a new heart” with “a new spirit.” This passage outlines all four of the features of Baptism. First, the Holy Spirit is imparted through Baptism (which Acts 2:37-38 also says explicitly).  Second, Baptism cleanses us from sin (as Acts 22:16 says).  Third, not only does it cleanse us from present sins, but it enables us to avoid sinning in the future, with the imparting of a new spirit. That’s how it both justifies and sanctifies us, as Paul says in 1 Corinthians 6:11.

Finally, through Baptism, we become the people of God.  Paul says in Colossians 2:11-12, “In Him you were also circumcised with a circumcision not administered by hand, by stripping off the carnal body, with the circumcision of Christ. You were buried with Him in Baptism, in which you were also raised with Him through faith in the power of God, who raised Him from the dead.” This is similar to his message in Romans 6:4, but here, Paul specifically describes it as the New Testament fulfillment of circumcision.  If you don’t recall, it was through circumcision that males were made members of Old Testament Israel.  This was done on the eighth day after birth (Gen. 17:12), and failure to do so meant that the boy wasn’t an Israelite (Gen. 17:14).  When Paul describes Baptism as the new circumcision, he’s calling upon an image central to Jewish identity.  From this, we can say with confidence that Baptism is to be extended even to infants, since those were the primary recipients of circumcision.  And since Baptism determines membership in the Church, as circumcision did in Israel, and we know that small children are part of the Church (Luke 18:16).  Otherwise, we’re saying that babies can be Jews (by circumcision) but not Christians (by Baptism), a bizarre conclusion, since the New Covenant is what opened the doors to the Gentile world.

Thanks for checking out my blog Joe. And I am glad the baptism went well. May the Lord bless your niece, your family, your blog and of course yourself and even Fr. Andrew.

Keep up the good work!

Catholic Cheat Sheet on Regenerative Baptism

Baptism of Christ, fragment from the Catacombs...

Look mom, my blog was mentioned on another Catholic apologist’s blog! And it’s one that I subscribe to. Now this is not the first time this has occurred but it is still pretty cool.

As I was going through my Google Reader list, I came across the following post:

The Biblical Basis for Regenerative Baptism
My niece is getting baptized this weekend, so I thought I’d dedicate this post to her, and to the awesome power of Baptism. The blog Jesus, I Trust in You has a very good “Catholic Cheat Sheet.”  It’s a quick go-to guide of Scriptural support in favor of given Church teachings.

via Shameless Popery: The Biblical Basis for Regenerative Baptism.

The bulk of the post highlights the verses speaking to regenerative baptism but, as I would expect from any blog called Shameless Popery, blogger Joe Heschmeyer even adds a new verse and provides some insight why.

How cool is this?

In addition to these, I would add Ezekiel 36:24-28. In it, God promises that the Day is coming when He’ll unite Him people through a regenerative washing in pure water by the power of the Holy Spirit, and that after it, we will be His people, and He will be Our God:

“For I will take you out of the nations; I will gather you from all the countries and bring you back into your own land. I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be cleanI will cleanse you from all your impurities and from all your idols. I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put My Spirit in you and move you to follow My decrees and be careful to keep My laws. Then you will live in the land I gave your ancestors; you will be my people, and I will be your God.”

I can’t think of anything more regenerative than God creating in us “a new heart” with “a new spirit.” This passage outlines all four of the features of Baptism. First, the Holy Spirit is imparted through Baptism (which Acts 2:37-38 also says explicitly).  Second, Baptism cleanses us from sin (as Acts 22:16 says).  Third, not only does it cleanse us from present sins, but it enables us to avoid sinning in the future, with the imparting of a new spirit. That’s how it both justifies and sanctifies us, as Paul says in 1 Corinthians 6:11.

Finally, through Baptism, we become the people of God.  Paul says in Colossians 2:11-12, “In Him you were also circumcised with a circumcision not administered by hand, by stripping off the carnal body, with the circumcision of Christ. You were buried with Him in Baptism, in which you were also raised with Him through faith in the power of God, who raised Him from the dead.” This is similar to his message in Romans 6:4, but here, Paul specifically describes it as the New Testament fulfillment of circumcision.  If you don’t recall, it was through circumcision that males were made members of Old Testament Israel.  This was done on the eighth day after birth (Gen. 17:12), and failure to do so meant that the boy wasn’t an Israelite (Gen. 17:14).  When Paul describes Baptism as the new circumcision, he’s calling upon an image central to Jewish identity.  From this, we can say with confidence that Baptism is to be extended even to infants, since those were the primary recipients of circumcision.  And since Baptism determines membership in the Church, as circumcision did in Israel, and we know that small children are part of the Church (Luke 18:16).  Otherwise, we’re saying that babies can be Jews (by circumcision) but not Christians (by Baptism), a bizarre conclusion, since the New Covenant is what opened the doors to the Gentile world.

Thanks for checking out my blog Joe. And I am glad the baptism went well. May the Lord bless your niece, your family, your blog and of course yourself and even Fr. Andrew.

Keep up the good work!

Vatican announces beatification of John Paul II

How cool is this! This is the pope under whom I was baptized into the Church. I still recall how much of an impact John Paul II had on my grandmother and she was always praying for him during her life. Praised be the Lord for sending us such a great “Fisher of Men” to lead His Church.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

Vatican announces beatification of John Paul II

How cool is this! This is the pope under whom I was baptized into the Church. I still recall how much of an impact John Paul II had on my grandmother and she was always praying for him during her life. Praised be the Lord for sending us such a great “Fisher of Men” to lead His Church.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

Reflections From the Saints: Mary, the Mother of God, on what He has done for her

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“My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has regarded the low estate of his handmaiden. For behold, henceforth all generations will call me blessed; for he who is mighty has done great things for me, and holy is his name. And his mercy is on those who fear him from generation to generation. He has shown strength with his arm, he has scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts, he has put down the mighty from their thrones, and exalted those of low degree; he has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he has sent empty away. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, as he spoke to our fathers, to Abraham and to his posterity for ever.”

Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen of Heaven and Theotokos (The Gospel According to St. Luke 1:46-55)