Tag Archives: Marriage

Five Steps to Better Parenting

English: Holy Family, Mary, Joseph, and child ...
English: Holy Family, Mary, Joseph, and child Jesus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The following is some good advice for parents:

  • Make the most of our time together.  My son and I have been having great conversations on the way to lacrosse practice and when we throw the football in our front yard.  The important thing is to maximize every minute with our children as opportunities to share and guide them to good decisions in life.  Making family dinner time a priority is one way to help make this happen.  Know that efforts to get our attention are often potential cries for help.  They need us, but are we available?
  • Listen before lecturing.  This is difficult for me!  The fastest way to have my son clam up is for me to cut him off with a “coaching moment.”  I can coach later, but I need to hear him out first and encourage him to share his thoughts.
  • Be great Catholic role models.  It doesn’t get more basic than this, but do we realize how often our children are watching our every move?  They will love God, be excited about Mass and have devotion to our Catholic faith if we do.  They will likely pray faithfully if we do. They will be more likely to grow up following the Magisterium and staying out of the “Catholic cafeteria line” if we do.
  • Honor the Sacrament of marriage.  Want to see our children get married and start great families some day?  Love our spouses and model the kind of marriage we want them to enjoy.  Show open affection, say “I love you” and make sure the kids know how much we honor and respect the person we have married.  We are dooming our kids to a marriageless future or possible divorce if they grow up in a home where the Sacrament of marriage is not treasured and valued.
  • Tune out popular culture and “detach.”  Guess what?  If we are obsessed with American Idol, buying junk we don’t need and trying to keep up with the neighbors, our kids are likely to emulate our behavior.  I am beginning to feel that every minute spent in front of the TV or the computer is wasted time and a missed opportunity to interact with the family.  This may be the hardest thing on the list, but we can do a better job with our time and focus.

via Throwing the Football and Five Steps to Better Parenting : The Integrated Catholic Life.

Target releases ad featuring same-sex ‘married’ couple | LifeSiteNews.com

Target's latest ad

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota, July 30, 2012 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Target is promoting their wedding registry with a focus on homosexualmarriage”. A new ad released last month depicts two men holding hands with the slogan, “Be yourself, together.”

The retail giant has angered both pro-family and pro-homosexual activists as they have apparently flip-flopped in their approach to same-sex “marriage”.

In 2010 Target faced some backlash from homosexual political groups after they gave $150,000 to MN Forward, a political group that supported Tom Emmer, the pro-life, pro-marriage Republican candidate for governor of Minnesota. More recently they have been criticized for their decision not to sell an album by Frank Ocean, who recently came out as homosexual.

But last month the chain began selling same-sex “marriage” wedding cards, and they have supported pride parades in Minneapolis for a number of years. In May, Target sold gay pride t-shirts ad gave the proceeds to the Family Equality Council, a homosexual political advocacy group.

via Target releases ad featuring same-sex ‘married’ couple | LifeSiteNews.com.

So it seems that the irrational-rationals think it just fine for a company to go ahead and move forward with open support of controversial issues and would rightly decry any boycott action against said company based solely on the expression of free speech – so long as the company remains on this (see above) side of the fence.

Now bring in a company whose president offers a personal opinion and where the corporation itself affirms its own long-standing policy against discrimination and commits to remaining out of the controversial debate and we see public officials and a motley bunch of yokels running around calling them bigots – all because they exercised the same freedom of speech.

So what is the difference? Well, in the latter case the company is remaining out of a controversial debate thus separating the views of a person within the company while not compromising the tenants on which the company was founded. And in the former you have a corporation that decide to inject the opinions of its leaders into the same debate, doing so as flip-flop pros, thus providing strong evidence that it is hedging its bets on what is seemingly the more lucrative customer base – single adults with vast, disposable incomes (generally speaking as most homosexual persons are unlikely to be supporting a family).

Not only is this crap, it is an alliance based in pragmatism and greed rather than on honesty and integrity. Like many illicit unions, the “marriage” between Target and the gay “wannabe marriage” promoters will be fleeting – especially when money begins to flow from the company like a bad night in Vegas.

When the Supreme Court ruled

When the Supreme Court ruled in June 1967 that Virginia’s law penalizing interracial marriage could not stand, it was not changing the fundamental and enduring meaning of marriage: It was affirming it. It was upholding the integrity of marriage by protecting it from irrelevant — and unconstitutional — racial manipulation. Virginia had interfered with the core elements of marriage in order to promote white supremacy, a value completely alien to marriage. Marriage is designed to bring men and women together; anti-miscegenation laws frustrated that design, and could not stand.

THE ESSENTIAL, PUBLIC PURPOSE OF MARRIAGE IS TO UNITE MALE AND FEMALE | ABYSSUS ABYSSUM INVOCAT / DEEP CALLS TO DEEP

 

In March of this year, Bishop Vera Lopez published a statement on the diocesan website expressing support for the “sexual, family and religious diversity forum.” The event was aimed at “eradicating what some sectors of the Church believe about homosexuality” — especially the belief “that homosexual acts are contrary to God.

In March of this year, Bishop Vera Lopez published a statement on the diocesan website expressing support for the “sexual, family and religious diversity forum.” The event was aimed at “eradicating what some sectors of the Church believe about homosexuality” — especially the belief “that homosexual acts are contrary to God.

via CNA | Bishop-supported homosexual ministry calls for same-sex ‘marriage’

I expect that there are going to be some serious repercussions for the heresy and dissension that this bishop and his supporters are engaging in. Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition is clear on homosexual activity. It is a no go.

The simple fact that a person is attracted to the same gender or not does not allow for them to live and unchaste lifestyle. Remember, chastity is lived according to the state of a person’s life with respect to their vocation – married, priest (men) or religious.

That is to say a single man or woman, in order to be chaste, must not engage in any sexual relations outside the institution of marriage, which is rightly between one man and one woman. To say otherwise is heresy.

Let us pray for this bishop, his supporters and all who are lead astray by them.

For those interested, the full context of the article is below:

Saltillo, Mexico, Jun 23, 2011 / 05:48 pm (CNA).- The San Elredo Community, which is backed by Bishop Raul Vera of Saltillo, Mexico, plans to request that civil unions between same-sex couples from now on be referred to as “marriage.”
 
Noe Ruiz, the coordinator of the community, said they would call on the new congress and governor of the State of Coahuila to establish policies that “respect” homosexuals, according to the June 16 edition of the Mexican newspaper Vanguardia.

The community is backed by Saltillo’s bishop despite its open opposition to Catholic teachings on homosexuality. 
 
Ruiz added that his group plans to propose that same-sex couples be allowed to adopt and receive social security benefits, and that civil unions between them be called “marriage.” 
 
The Diocese of Saltillo

Bishop Raul Vera Lopez of the Diocese of Saltillo has repeatedly expressed support for same-sex unions. 
 
In March of this year, Bishop Vera Lopez published a statement on the diocesan website expressing support for the “sexual, family and religious diversity forum.” The event was aimed at “eradicating what some sectors of the Church believe about homosexuality” — especially the belief “that homosexual acts are contrary to God.”
 
Fr. Robert Coogan, the American priest who founded San Elredo, told CNA, “The only answer the Catechism gives is to tell (homosexual persons) to be celibate, and that is not enough.” He voiced his own support for the legalization of same-sex unions and adoptions and said the community “has the strong support of the bishop.”
 
Noe Ruiz told CNA the purpose of the forum was to show that “two men or two women can raise a child and live normally like everyone else.”  
 
Pro-family groups in Saltillo, such as the Familias Mundi Association, disagreed with that argument. “We do not agree with forming same-sex families because families come from marriage, and marriage is a vocation that occurs between two people of the opposite sex who complement one another.”
 
CNA also interviewed Fr. Leopoldo Sanchez, who until a few months ago was the spiritual director for Courage Latino in Mexico, a ministry for homosexuals who wish to live according to the Church’s teachings. “The Church reminds us that the right path is the path of love, a love that is lived in chastity, and absolutely all Christians are called to this, regardless of whether they have same-sex attraction or not,” he said.

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All Things in His Time and in Unity With His Will

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Image via Wikipedia

After this past Sunday’s Mass I received two words from my pastor that I have longed to hear for over three years now, “it’s done.”

He was referring to my request to have my marriage convalidated within the Church. Convalidation of a marriage is basically the blessing/recognition/regularization of a marriage between a Catholic and a nonCatholic Christian whose “marriage,” for whatever, reason is not valid and sacramental due to some impediment. This impediment usually falls on the shoulders of the Catholic spouse because as baptized Catholics, they are bound to the Church (the binding and loosing thing).

The usual impediments in this case are failure to seek a dispensation from the Catholic’s bishop to marry a non-Catholic Christian and many times dispensation to marry outside of the Church. This was essentially my case.

As Catholics we are bound to follow the Church’s authority in these matters under penalty of sin. And a sin of this magnitude is considered a mortal sin in most cases. But because God desires that all men be saved there are always means to reconcile oneself to the Church, thus con-validation.

Con-validation is usually quick and simple – so long as both parties are willing. Unfortunately, this was not my case. When the spouse is not willing or able to participate there is one other means to correct a marriage in this state. That is called radial sanation:

The radical sanation of an invalid marriage is its convalidation without the renewal of consent, which is granted by competent authority and entails the dispensation from an impediment, if there is one, and from canonical form, if it was not observed, and the retroactivity of canonical effects. (Code of Canon Law 1161:1)

My parish pastor was giving me the positive news that our bishop approved my petition for radical sanation. At these words, “it’s done,” I felt such a relief that I held back my tears as I kneeled in a pew before the Tabernacle in thanksgiving.

There is still more for me to do on my journey to full reconciliation with Our Blessed Lord through His Church and that includes receiving the sacrament of Reconciliation, the Eucharist and later Confirmation.

Pray for me especially as I enter this season of Lent.

All Things in His Time and in Unity With His Will

Rembrandt's depiction of Samson's marriage feast

After this past Sunday’s Mass I received two words from my pastor that I have longed to hear for over three years now, “it’s done.”

He was referring to my request to have my marriage convalidated within the Church. Convalidation of a marriage is basically the blessing/recognition/regularization of a marriage between a Catholic and a nonCatholic Christian whose “marriage,” for whatever, reason is not valid and sacramental due to some impediment. This impediment usually falls on the shoulders of the Catholic spouse because as baptized Catholics, they are bound to the Church (the binding and loosing thing).

The usual impediments in this case are failure to seek a dispensation from the Catholic’s bishop to marry a non-Catholic Christian and many times dispensation to marry outside of the Church. This was essentially my case.

As Catholics we are bound to follow the Church’s authority in these matters under penalty of sin. And a sin of this magnitude is considered a mortal sin in most cases. But because God desires that all men be saved there are always means to reconcile oneself to the Church, thus con-validation.

Con-validation is usually quick and simple – so long as both parties are willing. Unfortunately, this was not my case. When the spouse is not willing or able to participate there is one other means to correct a marriage in this state. That is called radial sanation:

The radical sanation of an invalid marriage is its convalidation without the renewal of consent, which is granted by competent authority and entails the dispensation from an impediment, if there is one, and from canonical form, if it was not observed, and the retroactivity of canonical effects. (Code of Canon Law 1161:1)

My parish pastor was giving me the positive news that our bishop approved my petition for radical sanation. At these words, “it’s done,” I felt such a relief that I held back my tears as I kneeled in a pew before the Tabernacle in thanksgiving.

There is still more for me to do on my journey to full reconciliation with Our Blessed Lord through His Church and that includes receiving the sacrament of Reconciliation, the Eucharist and later Confirmation.

Pray for me especially as I enter this season of Lent.

A Call for the Return of [Proper] Christian Patriarchy

For a while now, I have been working my way through a thin volume from Tan Books/Saint Benedict Press 2010 releases: The Three Marks of Manhood: How to Be Priest, Prophet and King of Your Family. The length of time it took me to read this book in no way reflects the content or the author’s skill. What it does say is that I need to find more to time to pray and sleep.

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The Three Marks of Manhood: How to be Priest, Prophet, and King of Your Family. Cover image via AquinasAndMore.com

From the publisher:

Author G.C. Dilsaver writes that the time has come for Catholic families to re-discover true patriarchy – time for Catholic men to accept and fulfill their role as leader and head of their families. Christian manhood, as ordained by God and confirmed by Catholic teaching, is symbolized by three staffs: the Scepter of authority and self-discipline, the Crosier of spiritual stewardship, and the Cross of redemptive suffering. Three Marks of Manhood can help Christian families realize their identity to the fullest – empowering them to resist the encroachment of secular culture. Read it and learn how to build a strong and lasting marriage, raise children to become faithful men and women of God, and foster an authentic Catholic culture in your home.

On the surface, the above description seems to portray a self-help book for men. This is less a self-help book and more a splash of cold water to the face. Dilsaver does not pull a single punch it outlining the woeful state of manhood today, especially in the case of Christian men and even more especially those of the One True Faith – Catholics.

The book proceeds to build a comparison between the Mystical Body of Christ and what has long been called as the “little” Church otherwise referred to more recently as the “domestic” Church, that is the household of a validly married couple. In this, Dilsaver reminds men (and their spouses) that although the ordinary vocation of the espoused is to be a husband, we act in similar fashion of the ministerial priesthood by “putting on Christ” by means of the relationships in our lives. These relationships include our dealings with God, our wives, our children, our employers, etc.

Every point and lesson touched on in this book is certainly orthodox and on point. Perhaps it is fact that initially put me off as I flipped through the first few pages. Despite my fervent return to the Faith and my profession of fidelity to the Church and Christ, I felt a bit disturbed at the tone, which can most certainly be construed as counter-cultural especially by hardened feminists.

Long story short, this book does not mince words concerning the present state of manhood and offers valid, faithful and long-standing suggestions on how to reclaim our God-given roles as priest, prophet and king of our homes reminding us of St. Paul’s words in his Letter to the Ephesians:

Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ. Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior. As the church is subject to Christ, so let wives also be subject in everything to their husbands. Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. Even so husbands should love their wives as their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. For no man ever hates his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, as Christ does the church, because we are members of his body. “For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.” This is a great mystery, and I mean in reference to Christ and the church; however, let each one of you love his wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband.

— Ephesians (RSV) 5:21-33

You can purchase this book here.


I wrote this review of The Three Marks of Manhood for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, your source for Baptism Gifts and First Communion Gifts. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases.

I receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.


A Call for the Return of [Proper] Christian Patriarchy

For a while now, I have been working my way through a thin volume from Tan Books/Saint Benedict Press 2010 releases: The Three Marks of Manhood: How to Be Priest, Prophet and King of Your Family. The length of time it took me to read this book in no way reflects the content or the author’s skill. What it does say is that I need to find more to time to pray and sleep.


The Three Marks of Manhood: How to be Priest, Prophet, and King of Your Family. Cover image via AquinasAndMore.com

From the publisher:

Author G.C. Dilsaver writes that the time has come for Catholic families to re-discover true patriarchy – time for Catholic men to accept and fulfill their role as leader and head of their families. Christian manhood, as ordained by God and confirmed by Catholic teaching, is symbolized by three staffs: the Scepter of authority and self-discipline, the Crosier of spiritual stewardship, and the Cross of redemptive suffering. Three Marks of Manhood can help Christian families realize their identity to the fullest – empowering them to resist the encroachment of secular culture. Read it and learn how to build a strong and lasting marriage, raise children to become faithful men and women of God, and foster an authentic Catholic culture in your home.

On the surface, the above description seems to portray a self-help book for men. This is less a self-help book and more a splash of cold water to the face. Dilsaver does not pull a single punch it outlining the woeful state of manhood today, especially in the case of Christian men and even more especially those of the One True Faith – Catholics.

The book proceeds to build a comparison between the Mystical Body of Christ and what has long been called as the “little” Church otherwise referred to more recently as the “domestic” Church, that is the household of a validly married couple. In this, Dilsaver reminds men (and their spouses) that although the ordinary vocation of the espoused is to be a husband, we act in similar fashion of the ministerial priesthood by “putting on Christ“ by means of the relationships in our lives. These relationships include our dealings with God, our wives, our children, our employers, etc.

Every point and lesson touched on in this book is certainly orthodox and on point. Perhaps it is fact that initially put me off as I flipped through the first few pages. Despite my fervent return to the Faith and my profession of fidelity to the Church and Christ, I felt a bit disturbed at the tone, which can most certainly be construed as counter-cultural especially by hardened feminists.

Long story short, this book does not mince words concerning the present state of manhood and offers valid, faithful and long-standing suggestions on how to reclaim our God-given roles as priest, prophet and king of our homes reminding us of St. Paul’s words in his Letter to the Ephesians:

Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ. Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior. As the church is subject to Christ, so let wives also be subject in everything to their husbands. Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. Even so husbands should love their wives as their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. For no man ever hates his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, as Christ does the church, because we are members of his body. “For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.” This is a great mystery, and I mean in reference to Christ and the church; however, let each one of you love his wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband.

— Ephesians (RSV) 5:21-33

You can purchase this book here.


I wrote this review of The Three Marks of Manhood for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, your source for Baptism Gifts and First Communion Gifts. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases.

I receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.


Understanding the Means and Ends of Marriage

The mystery of marriage, natural and/or sacramental, was evident in humanity since the creation. Early in the passages of Genesis, God creates Adam and then his companion. This was beginning of natural marriage.  

God’s intent for marriage was plainly visible from the start:  

27 And God created man to his own image: to the image of God he created him: male and female he created them. 28 And God blessed them, saying: “Increase and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it, and rule over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and all living creatures that move upon the earth.” (Genesis 1)  

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Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love

One man was given one woman for the ultimate purposes of procreation through a life-long union of equal but complimentary souls (Genesis 2:24). In the classic work, Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love, author, philosopher and theologian Dietrich von Hildebrand reminds us of the divine origin of natural marriage and its fulfillment of sacramental grace in the New Testament in which marriage is the visible construct of Christ‘s love for the Church and for our very souls.

This is a small, almost pocket-sized work of marital spirituality that found itself out of print in the United States but ironically remained popular in Europe. Thanks to non-profit publisher Sophia Institute Press, we have the luxury of being reintroduced to this short and pithy work. For marriage today, as when von Hildebrand wrote the book, is suffering from demonization and contempt, which threatens the very foundation of society.  

It is in the rediscovery of true, transcendent and selfless love that we can fully understand the purpose and means of marriage and its role in the life of the Church and in the sanctification of humanity. As von Hildebrand rightly points out, marriage is not only a sacrament but it is a vocation with it being near equal to the Sacrament of Holy Orders.  

And if marriage is a vocation then it is logical to understand that it is God who calls us to serve him in this manner. And it is He that gives us the graces to carry it out in full – we need only to respond with acceptance. This is the core of Marriage – a call to reawaken the understanding of man and woman in this oldest of institutions.  

Sophia Institute Press sent me a complimentary copy of this book for me to review. You can purchase this book here.  

I wrote this review of Marriage for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, the largest Catholic store online. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.  

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases.  

I also receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.  

Understanding the Means and Ends of Marriage

The mystery of marriage, natural and/or sacramental, was evident in humanity since the creation. Early in the passages of Genesis, God creates Adam and then his companion. This was beginning of natural marriage.  

God’s intent for marriage was plainly visible from the start:  

27 And God created man to his own image: to the image of God he created him: male and female he created them. 28 And God blessed them, saying: “Increase and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it, and rule over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and all living creatures that move upon the earth.” (Genesis 1)  

Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love
Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love

One man was given one woman for the ultimate purposes of procreation through a life-long union of equal but complimentary souls (Genesis 2:24). In the classic work, Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love, author, philosopher and theologian Dietrich von Hildebrand reminds us of the divine origin of natural marriage and its fulfillment of sacramental grace in the New Testament in which marriage is the visible construct of Christ‘s love for the Church and for our very souls.

This is a small, almost pocket-sized work of marital spirituality that found itself out of print in the United States but ironically remained popular in Europe. Thanks to non-profit publisher Sophia Institute Press, we have the luxury of being reintroduced to this short and pithy work. For marriage today, as when von Hildebrand wrote the book, is suffering from demonization and contempt, which threatens the very foundation of society.  

It is in the rediscovery of true, transcendent and selfless love that we can fully understand the purpose and means of marriage and its role in the life of the Church and in the sanctification of humanity. As von Hildebrand rightly points out, marriage is not only a sacrament but it is a vocation with it being near equal to the Sacrament of Holy Orders.  

And if marriage is a vocation then it is logical to understand that it is God who calls us to serve him in this manner. And it is He that gives us the graces to carry it out in full – we need only to respond with acceptance. This is the core of Marriage – a call to reawaken the understanding of man and woman in this oldest of institutions.  

Sophia Institute Press sent me a complimentary copy of this book for me to review. You can purchase this book here.  

I wrote this review of Marriage for the Tiber River Blogger Review program, created by Aquinas and More Catholic Goods, the largest Catholic store online. For more information and to purchase, please visit Aquinas and More Catholic Goods.  

Tiber River is the first Catholic book review site, started in 2000 to help you make informed decisions about Catholic book purchases.  

I also receive free product samples as compensation for writing reviews for Tiber River.