Tag Archives: One Minute Meditations

One Minute Meditations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Work

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The Lord wants his children, those of us who have received the gift of faith, to proclaim the original optimistic view of creation, the love for the world which is at the heart of the Christian message.

So there should always be enthusiasm in your professional work, and in your effort to build up the earthly city.

 

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #703

 

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One Minute Meditations: St. Josemaria Escriva on Work

St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Pri...

The Lord wants his children, those of us who have received the gift of faith, to proclaim the original optimistic view of creation, the love for the world which is at the heart of the Christian message.

So there should always be enthusiasm in your professional work, and in your effort to build up the earthly city.

 

– St. Josemaria Escriva, The Forge, #703

 

Reflections From the Saints: Bernadette on Suffering

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“The more I am crucified, the more I rejoice.”

St. Bernadette Soubirous of Lourdes


Oldest of sixchildren born to Francois and Louise Casterot, and grew up very poor. Hired out as a servant from age 12 to 14.Shepherdess. On 11 February1858, around the time of her first Communion, she received a vision of the Virgin; her own account of it is in the Readings section below. She received seventeen more in the next five months, and was led to a spring of healing waters. She moved into a house with the Sisters of Nevers at Lourdes where she lived, worked, and learned to read and write. The sisters cared for the sick and indigent, and at age 22 they admitted Bernadette into their order since she was both. Always sick herself, and often mistreated by her superiors, she died with a prayer for Mary‘s aid. Since the appearances of Mary to young Bernadette in 1858, more than 200 million people have visited the shrine of Lourdes.

via Saints.SQPN.com » Blog Archive » Saint Bernadette of Lourdes.


Now some words from St. Paul on the matter:

“Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ‘s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church…”

Colossians (RSV) 1:24

“For it has been granted to you that for the sake of Christ you should not only believe in him but also suffer for his sake…”

Philippians (RSV) 1:29

“I appeal to you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship.”

— Romans (RSV) 12:1

Reflections From the Saints: Bernadette on Suffering

Saint Bernadette Soubirous of the Lourdes Appa...

“The more I am crucified, the more I rejoice.”

St. Bernadette Soubirous of Lourdes


Oldest of sixchildren born to Francois and Louise Casterot, and grew up very poor. Hired out as a servant from age 12 to 14.Shepherdess. On 11 February1858, around the time of her first Communion, she received a vision of the Virgin; her own account of it is in the Readings section below. She received seventeen more in the next five months, and was led to a spring of healing waters. She moved into a house with the Sisters of Nevers at Lourdes where she lived, worked, and learned to read and write. The sisters cared for the sick and indigent, and at age 22 they admitted Bernadette into their order since she was both. Always sick herself, and often mistreated by her superiors, she died with a prayer for Mary‘s aid. Since the appearances of Mary to young Bernadette in 1858, more than 200 million people have visited the shrine of Lourdes.

via Saints.SQPN.com » Blog Archive » Saint Bernadette of Lourdes.


Now some words from St. Paul on the matter:

“Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church…”

Colossians (RSV) 1:24

“For it has been granted to you that for the sake of Christ you should not only believe in him but also suffer for his sake…”

Philippians (RSV) 1:29

“I appeal to you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship.”

— Romans (RSV) 12:1

One Minute Meditations: St. Joesemaria Escriva on Idleness

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St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Priestly Society of the Holy Cross. Image via Wikipedia.

By neglecting small details you could work on and on without rest and yet live the life of a perfect idler.

– St. Josemaria Escriva, Furrow, #494


What is idleness?

According to Fr. John Hardon‘s Modern Catholic Dictionary (as found on CatholicCulture.org) defines idleness as:

Unwillingness to work. The reason may be physical, because a person lacks the strength; or mental, because one does not know what to do; or moral, because of laziness that will not expend the effort needed perhaps even to begin a task or at least perform it as it should be done.

Why is being unwilling to work bad?

Basically it boils down to shirking one’s responsibilities. If you are being paid to do something and you do not do it, then the Church teaches that it is the equivalent to stealing, assuming that it is all above-board of course.

Something else to consider is the phrase “idle hands/minds are the devil’s workshop/playground.” This phrase makes perfect theological sense especially in light of Scripture and Tradition:

Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you keep away from any brother who is living in idleness and not in accord with the tradition that you received from us. For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, we did not eat any one’s bread without paying, but with toil and labor we worked night and day, that we might not burden any of you. It was not because we have not that right, but to give you in our conduct an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: If any one will not work, let him not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work. Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work in quietness and to earn their own living. Brethren, do not be weary in well-doing.

2 Thessalonians (RSV) 3:6-13

One Minute Meditations: St. Joesemaria Escriva on Idleness

St. Josemaría, founder of Opus Dei and the Pri...

By neglecting small details you could work on and on without rest and yet live the life of a perfect idler.

– St. Josemaria Escriva, Furrow, #494

What is idleness?

According to Fr. John Hardon’s Modern Catholic Dictionary (as found on CatholicCulture.org) defines idleness as:

Unwillingness to work. The reason may be physical, because a person lacks the strength; or mental, because one does not know what to do; or moral, because of laziness that will not expend the effort needed perhaps even to begin a task or at least perform it as it should be done.

Why is being unwilling to work bad?

Basically it boils down to shirking one’s responsibilities. If you are being paid to do something and you do not do it, then the Church teaches that it is the equivalent to stealing, assuming that it is all above-board of course.

Something else to consider is the phrase “idle hands/minds are the devil’s workshop/playground.” This phrase makes perfect theological sense especially in light of Scripture and Tradition:

Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you keep away from any brother who is living in idleness and not in accord with the tradition that you received from us. For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, we did not eat any one’s bread without paying, but with toil and labor we worked night and day, that we might not burden any of you. It was not because we have not that right, but to give you in our conduct an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: If any one will not work, let him not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work. Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work in quietness and to earn their own living. Brethren, do not be weary in well-doing.

2 Thessalonians (RSV) 3:6-13

One Minute Meditations: St. Bernard on bearing the Cross

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Under the influence of fear, we bear the Cross of Christ with patience. Under the more inspiring influence of home, we carry the Cross with a firm and valiant heart. But under the consuming power of love, we embrace the Cross with ardor.

— St Bernard

One Minute Meditations: St. Bernard on bearing the Cross

Stations of the Cross

Under the influence of fear, we bear the Cross of Christ with patience. Under the more inspiring influence of home, we carry the Cross with a firm and valiant heart. But under the consuming power of love, we embrace the Cross with ardor.

— St Bernard

St Cyril of Alexandria: Mary is the Mediatrix of All Graces

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Icon of St. Cyril I, the 24th Patriarch of Alexandria.
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Taylor Marshall is a solid apologist and theologian. I often check his blog and am never disappointed, especially when I find fun facts, insights and quotes like the following from a homily given by St. Cyril of Alexandria, known to many as the “Great Defender of Christ:”

Hail Mary Theotokos [Mother of God], venerable treasure of the whole world, light unextinguished, crown of virginity, scepter of orthodoxy, indestructible temple, which contains the uncontainable…it is through you that the Holy Trinity is glorified and adored, through you, the precious cross is venerated and adored throughout the whole world, through you that heaven is in gladness, that angels and archangels rejoice, that demons are put to flight, through you that the tempter, the devil is cast down from heaven, through you that the fallen creature is raised up to heaven, through you that all creation, once imprisoned in idolatry, has reached knowledge of the truth, that the faithful obtain baptism and the oil of joy, churches have been founded in the whole world, that peoples are led to conversion.”

via Mary as Mediatrix in Church Fathers Saint Cyril ~ Canterbury Tales by Taylor Marshall.

The question that Taylor Marshall asks his Protestant readers concerning this is, “If you heard Saint Cyril, the great defender of Christ, preach this sermon, would you rejoice and say ‘Amen’ or would you walk out?”

Well, what is your answer?

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St Cyril of Alexandria: Mary is the Mediatrix of All Graces

St. Cyril I, 24th Patriarch of Alexandria
Icon of St. Cyril I, the 24th Patriarch of Alexandria.
Image via Wikipedia.

Taylor Marshall is a solid apologist and theologian. I often check his blog and am never disappointed, especially when I find fun facts, insights and quotes like the following from a homily given by St. Cyril of Alexandria, known to many as the “Great Defender of Christ:”

Hail Mary Theotokos [Mother of God], venerable treasure of the whole world, light unextinguished, crown of virginity, scepter of orthodoxy, indestructible temple, which contains the uncontainable…it is through you that the Holy Trinity is glorified and adored, through you, the precious cross is venerated and adored throughout the whole world, through you that heaven is in gladness, that angels and archangels rejoice, that demons are put to flight, through you that the tempter, the devil is cast down from heaven, through you that the fallen creature is raised up to heaven, through you that all creation, once imprisoned in idolatry, has reached knowledge of the truth, that the faithful obtain baptism and the oil of joy, churches have been founded in the whole world, that peoples are led to conversion.”

via Mary as Mediatrix in Church Fathers Saint Cyril ~ Canterbury Tales by Taylor Marshall.

The question that Taylor Marshall asks his Protestant readers concerning this is, “If you heard Saint Cyril, the great defender of Christ, preach this sermon, would you rejoice and say ‘Amen’ or would you walk out?”

Well, what is your answer?

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